Did You Know: Florida’s Manufacturing Industry Employs More than 360,000 Floridians

In fact, Florida’s manufacturing industry is growing faster than the U.S.

The Florida Chamber Foundation met with hundreds of manufacturers from around the state at FloridaMakes’ Make More Manufacturing Summit last week in Orlando – a national hub for advanced manufacturing. From discussions on the future of Florida’s manufacturing industry and the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade & Logistics reports, to why the Move, Make, Multiply strategy is key to securing Florida’s global competitiveness and how we can continue to build our talent workforce- manufacturing leaders are making sure the right conversations are happening.

In a letter to the editor submitted to the Orlando Sentinel, Kevin Carr, CEO of FloridaMakes, discusses the importance of building Florida’s manufacturing economy:

“The development of a current and future talent base, the adoption and application of advanced manufacturing technologies, and an increase in our share of the domestic and international market for manufactured goods will translate to a more resilient and robust manufacturing economy in Florida.”

Share Your Thoughts on Florida’s Manufacturing Industry

The impact of manufacturing to Florida’s $1 trillion economy is significant. Tell us what you think about Florida’s manufacturing future by clicking here to take the Florida Chamber’s manufacturing survey.

Did You Know: Higher Education Attainment Means More Opportunities

 

While Florida remains a leader in the nation, our state will need to create two million net new jobs between now and 2030. There are currently 501,000 Floridians looking for jobs, and 242,600 Florida jobs looking for people.

Currently, Florida’s unemployment rate is at five percent. But depending on the level of education attainment, that number may be significantly lower or higher.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, a higher educational attainment level means a lower unemployment rate, more participation in the labor force and higher median weekly earnings.

What Does This Mean To You?

As we are preparing for a future where our state will need to create two million net new jobs between now and 2030, what can businesses do to ensure opportunities for every Floridian? Share your thoughts by taking this short survey.

Did You Know Florida’s Year-Over-Year Job Creation Beats U.S. Growth?

Florida’s Year-Over-Year Job Creation was 248,800, a 3.0 Percent Increase Compared to the 1.6 Percent Rate for the U.S.

While Florida remains a leader in the nation, our state will need to create two million net new jobs between now and 2030. There are currently 501,000 Floridians looking for jobs, and 235,900 Florida jobs looking for people. Florida’s job creation appears to have peaked in 2015. Continued job creation is crucial to meet the needs of businesses and families, and Florida will have to work hard to continue to create jobs and diversify its economy.

 

Learn More:

Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation presents a By The Numbers look at Florida’s economy both for today and the future. To begin receiving the Florida Chamber Foundation’s By The Numbers monthly updates, email us at info@flfoundation.org.

About the Florida Scorecard:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.org, presents metrics across Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Dr. Jerry Parrish with the Florida Chamber Foundation at jparrish@flfoundation.org.

Florida Companies Exported $52.0 Billion in Florida Origin Exports in 2016?

Did you know, data from TheFloridaScorecard.org shows Florida companies exported $52.0 billion in Florida origin exports in 2016? International trade provides Florida companies an opportunity to ship Florida-origin products around the world and allows our state to compete on a global stage. Dr. Jerry Parrish will present a Florida Scorecard Report on International Trade in Florida and unveil new metrics on TheFloridaScorecard.org this week during the Florida Chamber’s annual International Days event.

Share This:

Visit FloridaWins.org and share this article and more with your employees.

About the Florida Scorecard:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.org, presents metrics across Florida’s economy. Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Stat that takes an in-depth look at one aspect of Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Dr. Jerry Parrish with the Florida Chamber Foundation at jparrish@flfoundation.org.

Florida Has More Than 12 Million Registered Voters

Do you like being listened to or ignored? In November, Florida voters will have an opportunity to make sure their voice is heard and play a vital role in electing officials that will shape the future at the local, state and national level. The question is, of the more than 12 million voters registered, how many will participate?  In the 2014 general election, turnout of registered voters was only 51 percent.

As businesses and other organizations around Florida kick off Employee Voter Registration Week, have you registered to vote?  If you want to participate in the 2016 Primary Election, the last day to register is August 1.

To find out how to register to vote in your county, visit FloridaWins.org and click on “Register to Vote”.

About Florida Wins:

When Florida’s budget is in line with the needs of the state, Florida wins. Share this email to ensure that Florida remains the best place to live, work, play and learn. Visit FloridaWins.Org to learn more.

28% of Florida’s Land is Held in Conservation

According to the latest data from TheFloridaScorecard.org, approximately 28 percent of Florida’s land is in conservation. This means 10 million of Florida’s 34.7 million acres of land is owned by local, state and federal government.

How much of your county’s land is in conservation? View your county’s Scorecard to find out.

About Florida Wins:

When Florida’s budget is in line with the needs of the state, Florida wins. Ensure Florida remains the best place to live, work, play and learn. Visit FloridaWins.Org to learn more.

77% of Florida’s General Revenue Comes from Sales & Use Tax

July 1 marks the beginning of the State of Florida’s fiscal year and the implementation of the state’s $82.3 billion budget, which is Florida’s largest budget to date. Do you know where your state tax dollars come from or how they are spent? Click here and here to find out.

Did You Know:

  • 77 percent of general revenue comes from sales and use tax,
  • Almost $1 in every $4 goes to education spending,
  • 42 percent of funding goes to health and human services,
  • Unlike some other states, Florida has a balanced budget, and
  • Florida’s growth has allowed us to make more investments, even while we have instituted tax cuts over the last five years.

Would future savings in tax dollars make a difference to your household or your business?

 

Get Involved:

To learn more about business climate and competitiveness and the other factors that will drive Florida’s future economy, join us at the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Future of Florida Forum on September 28-30, in Orlando. Click here to reserve your room today.

Housing the Homeless Could Save Floridians Millions of Dollars Each Year

Florida’s homeless population ranks third largest in the nation. The 2015 Annual Homeless Assessment Report estimated that nearly 36,000 adults in Florida were homeless and Florida public schools reported an astounding 73,322 children as homeless or having unstable housing last year. Homelessness not only affects the individuals and families living in poverty, but also impacts the local and state economy and future prosperity.

A recent study found that the cost of chronic homelessness in Central Florida is estimated to be $31,000 per person per year in healthcare, law enforcement, education, social services, and substance abuse and mental health program expenses. The same study reported that providing affordable housing and case management for this population has an estimated cost of $10,000 per person per year, representing potential savings of millions of dollars to taxpayers in the future. Several companies and organizations, like Central Florida Partnership, J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. and Wells Fargo, have partnered on initiatives to end homelessness in Florida.

Jobs and education create equal opportunity and hope for all Floridians, including our most vulnerable residents. How will your business and your community lead the effort to break the cycle of generational poverty and reduce chronic homelessness?

Did You Know in 2030, 1/3 of Florida’s Current Workforce Will be Retired or Planning to Retire?

Over the next 15 years, more than 2 million Floridians will celebrate their 65th birthday- about 700 every day- and become part of the 1 in 4 active seniors living here in 2030. Are you prepared for the disruption that retirement will have on your community’s workforce?

Since Florida’s aging population represents some of the most vibrant and engaged in the country, we should expect robust entrepreneurial and community level activity from them across the state. (Will Baby Boomers ever really slow down?)

It is not too soon to build cross-generational programs to leverage the insights and entrepreneurial spirit found in leaders of all ages in your company. Businesses and communities need to start preparing for the transfer of knowledge, adaptive living, healthcare, and service needs required to address this growing demographic.

“Among our state’s many unique resources are Florida’s vibrant senior communities,” said Kay Ayers, Senior Vice President of Human Resources at SantaFe HealthCare. “Ensuring their continued health and well-being reduces unnecessary healthcare costs, increases levels of volunteerism, and allows for the transfer of knowledge and skills to those entering the workplace – a critical component to meeting our future workforce needs.”

Share Your Story:

Is your organization preparing for the transfer of knowledge required by 2030? Is your community ready for the new normal? Send examples of your strategies or concerns to jparrish@flfoundation.org.

About the Florida Scorecard:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.com, presents metrics across Florida’s economy. Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Stat that takes an in-depth look at one aspect of Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Dr. Jerry Parrish with the Florida Chamber Foundation at 850.521.1283.

Florida Chamber’s International Days Focuses on Making Florida More Competitive

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Edie Ousley, 850-521-1231 or 850-251-6261
eousley@flchamber.com

Global Economic Opportunities Takes Center Stage

TALLAHASSEE, FL. (April 8, 2015) – International businesses leaders joined forces today at the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s International Days to focus on making Florida more competitive through global economic opportunities. Leaders from Shanghai to Canada, representatives from Fortune 500 companies and Florida’s 15 deep water seaports, the state’s leading economic development and transportation agencies are taking part in the state’s premier international event.

Global trade is big business in Florida. International business and foreign direct investments accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity and supports more than one million Florida jobs. Florida is also home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe – many of them small to medium sized businesses.

“It’s Florida’s time because we are in the right position, we have the right culture, we have the right infrastructure,” said Lee Sandler, chair of the Florida Chamber’s International Business Council. “So Florida, and Floridian companies, are really in a position to take advantage of the global economy in ways we didn’t have available before.”

In Florida, global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity. According to a recent Florida Chamber Foundation Did You Know, Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.

Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson kicked-off the two-day event, and additional speakers will include Secretary of Transportation Jim Boxold, along with keynote speakers: Fredrik Eliasson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, CSX Transportation, and John Murphy, Senior Vice President for International Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

A complete line up of panels and speakers is located here.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Did You Know Florida Typically Receives Nearly Half Its Yearly Rainfall In Only Three Months?

Although precipitation rates in Florida vary from year to year, most years Florida receives nearly half of its rainfall during the months of June, July and August. This is important because although Florida receives more rain than most states, much of the rainfall is lost as storm water runoff. Florida has many months where there is little rainfall, so being able to capture rain water and use it during the drier months will help Florida prepare for the expected increase of 28 percent more water by 2030.

Chart_FLRainfaill

Data Source: Florida State University Climate Center

According to Michael Minton, Central Florida Water Initiative (CFWI) member, and Chair of Dean Mead’s Agribusiness Industry Team, Florida’s water management system was designed to drain rainfall from inland areas to the coast as rapidly as possible to keep land usable for commercial and residential development, agriculture, and other land use needs. To continue to grow, Florida must move from a water drainage system to a water storage system.

The challenge for Florida will be how to prepare for population increases, ever-more visitors with four years of record visitation to Florida and further increases expected, as well as more business expansions and relocations to Florida.

“I believe water is the biggest long-term issue facing Florida. If we don’t have a sustainable, high-quality, affordable source of water to support environmental and economic development initiatives, then Florida as we know it ceases to exist,” said Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

Florida is the national leader in reusing water, most of which is used for residential and golf course irrigation. As of 2013, there are 482 facilities providing recycled water in our state.

Studies indicate that Florida will need $32.4 billion in new drinking and wastewater infrastructure spending by 2020, as well as $750 million over the next 10 years for capital improvements and maintenance for flood control.

Florida also has the opportunity to expand its leading positions in fruit and vegetable production, if water resources in our state are developed properly for the future. With recurring droughts in other states, Florida could produce even more healthy food for our families as well as those in other states and other countries. Florida is already the number one state in value of production of oranges and grapefruit as well as fresh market snap beans, cucumbers, sweet corn, tomatoes, and watermelons.

According to Commissioner Putnam, “When our communities work together with our water districts, Florida can be prepared not only to produce more fresh Florida food, but we can also be prepared for increases in the population and more business activity and tourism.”

The Florida Chamber’s Capitol Days will be held March 4-6 in Tallahassee, and will feature leaders from the Legislature and experts from around the state on many topics, including Securing Florida’s Water FutureClick here to view the agenda. Click here to register for the Florida Chamber’s Capitol Days.

Share Your Story:

How is your business engaged in exporting Florida-origin products? Share your story by contacting the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Chief Economist Jerry Parrish at jparrish@flfoundation.org.

Did You Know Florida Will Consume 1.3 Billion More Gallons of Water a Day by 2030

Did You Know?

By the year 2030, Floridians will need 1.3 billion more gallons of water every day, more than a 20 percent increase compared to 2010 demands?

With six million more residents and 100 million visitors on the horizon, our state must remain focused on making sure we can meet this growing need.

As a state surrounded by water, it’s often times difficult to picture Florida as having long-term water challenges. But as a state that receives more than 70 percent of our rainfall within just three months, there are several months where there is little to no rainfall at all – leaving our state in a vulnerable position when it comes to drinkable water.

“Rain water is what recharges and fills our lakes, streams and fresh waters aquifers, and these are what supply our drinking water as well as sustain the environment,” explains Philip Waller, Vice President at MWH Americas on the latest Florida Chamber Series on Free Enterprise.

Throughout the past 20 years, Florida has become a national leader in the reuse of water. Approximately 719 million gallons per day of reclaimed water was reused for beneficial purposes in 2013.  This conservation effort saved an estimated 139 billion gallons of potable quality water and added more than 85 billion gallons back to available ground water supplies.

By creating sustainable water conservation solutions, our state can meet needs while protecting our valuable natural resources.

Families and businesses can participate in water conservation easily, by installing moisture sensors on irrigation systems, watering only when needed or installing water efficient toilets, faucets and showerheads.

By working together, Florida can responsibly plan for a new generation of water users.

“The good news is we have really robust science-based programs that are already in affect that protect our water resources,” David Childs, water policy expert with Hopping, Green & Sams, said recently on the Florida Chamber’s Bottom Line. “I expect the Legislature will continue to support the implementation of those programs and ensure that our resources are protected.”

Tell Us What You Think:

What measures does your business or family take to conserve water? Send an email to jparrish@flfoundation.org to share your story.

If you are interested in other infrastructure conversations on the horizon, join the Florida Chamber Foundation at the 2015 Transportation Summit on January 29.

Are you interested in your community joining a Six Pillars Caucus or becoming a Six Pillars Community? Want to learn how The Florida Scorecard can work for your organization? Let us know by emailing us at TLowe@flfoundation.org.

About the Florida Scorecard Did You Know:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.com, presents metrics across Florida’s economy? Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Stat that takes an in-depth look at one aspect of Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Dr. Jerry Parrish with the Florida Chamber Foundation at 850.521.1283 or jparrish@flfoundation.org. You can also follow the Florida Chamber Foundation on Twitter at @FLChamberFDN.

Florida Added 32,000 Jobs in October 2014

Did You Know?

Florida job creators added 32,000 private-sector jobs during October, which helped lower the state’s unemployment rate to 6.0 percent.

Low tax, pro-growth policies are making a difference for families. Consider that:

  • Nine out of Florida’s 10 major industries saw positive over-the-year job growth in October,
  • 59 of Florida’s 67 counties saw their unemployment rate drop, and
  • Florida has experienced 56 consecutive months of positive job growth.

Since December 2010, Florida has added 679,000 private-sector jobs, and has dropped its unemployment rate by 5.1 percentage points. In fact, since April 2012, Florida’s annual job growth rate has been better than the national rate.

And more jobs are on the horizon. Projections from the Florida Economic Estimating Conference show that, assuming no significant changes, Florida is forecasted to add approximately 178,000 jobs throughout the coming year.

Florida is not only growing again, but according to Mark Vitner, a Senior Economist with Wells Fargo Securities, it’s doing it the right way. “We’ve made tremendous strides in moving up the value chain,” said Vitner. “It’s a far different world today than it was 10 or 20 years ago, a far healthier mix of jobs and far more promising future.”

With the release of October’s employment numbers, Department of Economic Opportunity Executive Director Jesse Panuccio commented on Florida’s economic indicators and stated, “Florida is showing the nation that low tax, pro-growth policies make a difference for families.  The 32,000 new private sector jobs, the 268,000 job openings, and an unemployment rate down to 6.0 percent mean that Florida is getting back to work.”

But we must continue to plan for the future.

  • By 2030, Florida will need to create nearly two million net new jobs across the state to maintain a six percent unemployment rate, according to the Florida Chamber Foundation.

“It is essential that communities and job creators across Florida stay focused on diversification and building the economy of tomorrow to attract high wage jobs, achieve global competitiveness, and maintain our high quality of life and the vibrant and sustainable communities we have grown accustomed to,” said Florida Chamber Foundation Executive Vice President Tony Carvajal.

We’re now turning the tables on you. How is your community and industry preparing for the economy of tomorrow? Tell us your story.

Want to Take Part in Securing Florida’s Future?

The Florida Chamber Foundation is currently recruiting the brightest minds from industry across the state to help us secure Florida’s future. If you would like to have your voice heard as we prepare the Cornerstone 2030 report, contact Tony Carvajal today.

Are you interested in your community joining a Six Pillars Caucus or becoming a Six Pillars Community? Want to learn how The Florida Scorecard can work for your organization? Let us know by emailing us at tlowe@flfoundation.org.

About the Florida Scorecard Did You Know:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.com, presents metrics across Florida’s economy? Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Stat that takes an in-depth look at one aspect of Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Tracey Lowe with the Florida Chamber Foundation at 850.521.1226 or TLowe@FLFoundation.org. You can also follow the Florida Chamber Foundation on Twitter at @FLChamberFDN.

Did You Know Florida’s Private-Sector Has Created 651,300 Jobs Since December 2010?

Did You Know?

Florida job creators added 12,800 private-sector jobs over the month of September which helped lower Florida’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate to 6.1%, down two basis points to one of the lowest since the recession began. Nine of the ten major industries across Florida experienced positive over the year job growth through September, with only government employment showing a decline over the year. In September, 66 of Florida’s 67 counties saw unemployment drop.

Since December of 2010, Florida has added 651,300 private-sector jobs and we have dropped five percentage points in unemployment, reducing Florida’s unemployment rate from 11.1% to 6.1%. Our state has experienced 50 consecutive months of positive job growth and Florida’s annual job growth rate has been better than the nation’s rate since April of 2012.

Forecasts from the July meeting of the Florida Economic Estimating Conference suggest that, assuming no significant changes, Florida is forecasted to add approximately 200,000 over the year as it marches back to its peak employment by 2016.

As we project forward to 2030, population growth and demographic changes are going to play a big part in Florida’s future workforce. Based on Florida Chamber Foundation estimates, we will need to create close to two million net new jobs across the state to maintain a six percent unemployment rate. “The kind of jobs we create will define the kind of Florida we live in,” said Chamber Foundation Executive Vice President Tony Carvajal. “As the global landscape continues to evolve and Florida positions itself as the leading place for talent and economic opportunity, we will need to maintain a focus on the diversification of our economy in every community in order to achieve global competitiveness, high wage jobs, and vibrant and sustainable communities.”

Tell Us Your Story

Is your community experiencing the benefits of the economic recovery of the last four years? What kind of activities would you like to see the state continue, or avoid, as we continue our growth? How is your community and industry preparing for the economy of tomorrow? Tell us your story.

Want to Take Part in Securing Florida’s Future?

The Florida Chamber Foundation is currently recruiting the brightest minds from industry across the state to help us secure Florida’s future. If you would like to have your voice heard as we prepare the Cornerstone 2030 report, contact Tony Carvajal today.

Are you interested in your community joining a Six Pillars Caucus or becoming a Six Pillars Community?

Want to learn how The Florida Scorecard can work for your organization? Let us know by emailing us at tlowe@flfoundation.org.

About the Florida Scorecard Did You Know:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.com, presents metrics across Florida’s economy? Each month, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Stat that takes an in-depth look at one aspect of Florida’s economy. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Stat or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Tracey Lowe with the Florida Chamber Foundation at 850.521.1226 or TLowe@FLFoundation.org. You can also follow the Florida Chamber Foundation on Twitter at @FLChamberFDN.

The Global Marketplace Will Double, Adding 1 Billion Consumers by 2020

Throughout the next 20 years, the size of the global marketplace will double, adding more than one billion new consumers by 2020. More than 95 percent of the world’s economic activity will take place outside of Florida. Florida’s ability to secure our future prosperity depends in part on how we are able to capture portions of that growth.

We live in an era unlike any before. The speed of global communication, the exponential advances of technology and the ingenuity of entrepreneurial activities have created a new landscape for global commerce that we continue to adapt to. According to global trends research from Ernst and Young, “estimates show that 70% of world growth over the next few years will come from emerging markets, with China and India accounting for 40% of that growth.

Take manufacturing costs in America for instance. Recent in-depth research on the global manufacturing landscape conducted by Boston Consulting Group (BCG) states that current conditions have led to a “redrawing of the map of global manufacturing cost competitiveness.” Simply put, the United States is now benefitting as one of the top 25 leading export economies. In fact, according to the BCG report, the U.S. is now ranked as a rising global star:

 Cost structures in Mexico and the U.S. improved more than in all of the other 25 largest exporting economies. Because of low wage growth, sustained productivity gains, stable exchange rates, and a big energy-cost advantage, these two nations are the current rising stars of global manufacturing. We estimate that Mexico now has lower average manufacturing costs than China on a unit-cost basis. And except for China and South Korea, the rest of the world’s top-ten goods exporters are 10 to 25 percent more expensive than the U.S.

 

Chart_GlobalMarketplace

What Does This Mean for Florida?

In our own state, the nation’s growth is echoed. In fact, as manufacturing trends shift away from Asia and toward North America, Florida firms can leverage this to expand economic growth. This will mean a growing emphasis on the skill-sets needed to compete in the 21st Century economy. As the global market grows, so does the need for greater manufacturing capacity, high-tech skills, and logistics systems to get goods to market.

“Continuing to promote the growth and expansion of manufacturing in Florida is vital to our success as a state,” said Al Stimac, Owner and President, Metal Essence, Inc. “With the influx of new residents and increasing opportunities to sell and ship Florida-origin goods internationally- the future for Florida’s manufacturers’ looks bright. With Florida’s top-notch business climate and trade and logistics assets, it’s like we’re sitting on a goldmine.”

In Florida, we have a great opportunity to use these global trends for our benefit. Florida’s global resources, current international trade relationships and infrastructure lend our state to work with growing markets and become more globally competitive. Consider that there are more than 10,000 multinational companies operating in our state and in 2011, foreign direct investment by multinational companies employed more than 238,000 Floridians.

Additionally, Florida’s existing logistics infrastructure makes us uniquely suited to capture a good portion of this shift. Consider that:

 

  • Florida’s infrastructure is ranked No. 1 in the US
  • Florida has the 3rd highest cluster of logistics and distribution establishments in the US
  • Florida is the 6th largest exporting state in the US and a leading global hub
  • Florida is No. 5 for Foreign Trade Zone warehouse and distribution activities in the U.S.
  •  Florida is No. 2 for Foreign Trade Zone exports in the US

 

More than ever, trade equals new high-wage jobs. According to data released by the U.S. Commerce Department, just in 2013 alone Florida’s exports supported more than 275,000 jobs. Research completed by the Florida Chamber Foundation highlights as many as 150,000 new jobs in trade, transportation and logistics in Florida are possible. But realizing the potential requires vision.

“This is a long-term advancement opportunity,” said John Hartnett, V.P. of Global Business Development, Endoscopy Replacement Parts, Inc. “Understanding the current global economic patterns presents an incredible advantage for our state just in manufacturing alone. Florida is positioned to capitalize on these shifts if our approach is comprehensive, strategic and aggressive. By continuing to address our manufacturing capacity and aligning our resources such as our STEM talent pipeline, business expansion ability, logistic infrastructure and high-tech job growth, we can become the epitome of 21st Century global competitiveness. We have many of the pieces in place, and we have much of the plan identified.”

 

Recognizing the shift and its implications for Florida is just the first piece – how we strategically plan for leveraging the dynamic changes in the global market will make the difference between being a passive participant and a global leader.

You Can Help Secure Florida’s Future:

Join us at the 2014 Future of Florida Forum, September 29 – October 1,as business leaders, industry experts and elected officials discuss and explore how to secure Florida’s future. The program features top level executives and identifies connection points and partnerships that will make Florida a state with vibrant communities, high-wage jobs and endless opportunities for global competitiveness. Register today and be part of generating solutions.

Tell Us Your Story:

How is your organization impacted by global manufacturing? Where do you see room for Florida to improve its competitive position?

 

About the Florida Scorecard Did You Know:

The Florida Scorecard, located at www.TheFloridaScorecard.com, presents metrics across Florida’s economy. Each week, the Florida Chamber Foundation produces a Scorecard Did You Know that takes an in-depth look at one specific statistic. If you would like additional information on the Weekly Scorecard Did You Know or on the Florida Scorecard, please contact Tracey Lowe with the Florida Chamber Foundation at 850.521.1200 or TLowe@FLFoundation.org. You can also follow the Florida Chamber Foundation on Twitter at @FLChamberFDN.