Florida Chamber of Commerce Celebrates World Trade Month

Encourages Renewal of NAFTA

 TALLAHASSEE Fla. (May 1, 2018)— The Florida Chamber of Commerce is celebrating May as World Trade Month and is reinforcing the important role global trade plays in creating jobs, growing opportunities for small businesses and increasing foreign direct investment.

Despite the flurry of trade actions on exports and imports, the Florida Chamber remains committed to Florida succeeding as a global hub for trade, in order to ensure we remain competitive in a global marketplace. Expanding rules-based trade and investment is a key engine for Florida’s growth. The Florida Chamber is actively working to advance these efforts on behalf of the business community, every day.

“Florida is not just a great place to live and do business, but has an incredibly diversified economy” said BOB GRAMMIG, Chair, Florida Chamber of Commerce and Partner, Holland & Knight. “By expanding Florida’s role as the global hub for trade and logistics, we are creating jobs, attracting and retaining talent and providing more opportunities for businesses who want to grow or expand in our state.”

The Florida Chamber of Commerce has a long-standing history of supporting free trade, expanding international trade and investment opportunities for Florida’s business community, advocating for fair and equitable market access for Florida-origin exports abroad, and eliminating barriers that are harmful to Florida’s competitiveness as a global hub for trade.

Consider the Economic Impacts of Trade in Florida:

  • Florida ranks sixth in the nation in terms of foreign direct investment employment—with foreign companies employing more than 327,000 Floridians,
  • International trade supports more than two million jobs in Florida, that’s one in five jobs,
  • International business accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economy, and
  • In 2017, Florida’s total merchandise trade reached $147.7 billion.

Yesterday, the Florida Chamber and Ontario Chamber of Commerce announced their partnership supporting continued cross-border trade agreements between Florida and Ontario, and encouraged the renewal of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) during the current renegotiation process.

“With nearly 500 Canadian companies employing Floridians, it is important that we continue to maintain and expand our relationship with Ontario and Canada to fuel economic growth,” said MARK WILSON, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce.  “The Florida Chamber is proud to join the Ontario Chamber in support of free trade and modernization and renewal of NAFTA.”

Members of the Florida Chamber of Commerce will travel to Washington, D.C., in the coming days to encourage Florida’s Congressional Delegation to support Florida job creators, and to work to ensure that trade continues to benefit the U.S. and Floridians.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

A Guide to Water

 

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Florida is preparing for a time of unprecedented change. By 2030, we will be home to 26 million residents. As we anticipate the impact this growing population will have on our state, it is crucial that we protect and maintain high quality and well managed water resources. Our priorities must include:

  • Preserving the quality of water bodies, fisheries, and aquifers that support tourism, agriculture and economic development.
  • Improving wastewater infrastructure and minimize health and environmental/economic impacts.
  • Investing in private and public water, wastewater, and stormwater infrastructure improvements.
  • Incentivizing water conservation, reuse, and innovative technologies to limit depletion of Florida’s aquifers. Build new infrastructure projects and diversify water sources to meet growing demand through greater use of reclaimed water, desalination, and other strategies.

For information on preparing Florida’s infrastructure for smart growth and development, download the Florida 2030 Key Targets & Strategies by visiting www.Florida2030.org


 

Resources

Florida Department of Environment Protection
Florida Chamber Water Solutions

A Guide to Transportation & Logistics

 

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Florida is home to some of the world’s busiest airports, an expanding rail system and 15 public seaports. Florida is also a global launch pad for commercial space exploration.

Transportation is crucial to our ability to diversify and expand Florida’s economy, to compete globally and to attract new businesses and industries and as Florida prepares for a population increase by 2030 to 26 million residents, today is the time to prepare for the future. An efficient and connected transportation system will:

  • Provide high levels of passenger connectivity options,
  • Position Florida’s airports, seaports, and spaceports to accommodate growth in demand,
  • Transform Florida’s major transportation corridors to accommodate multiple modes of transportation and multiple types of infrastructure,
  • Support growing demand for a wide range of mobility options,
  • and more

For the complete Florida 2030 recommendations, download the Florida 2030 Key Targets & Strategies by visiting www.Florida2030.org


 

Resources

Florida Chamber Foundation Transportation Video – What Does the Future of Transportation in Florida Look Like?

Florida Chamber Foundation Trade and Logistics 2.0 report.

Florida Trade and Logistics Study (2010)

A Guide to Planning & Development

 

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Florida’s climate, scenic beauty, and cultural and recreational amenities attract residents, tourists, and businesses from around the globe. As Florida’s population grows, the state’s ability to coordinate economic development, land use, and infrastructure,  and planning over the next two to twenty years will be a crucial determinant of its ability to sustain additional growth while maintaining a high quality of life.

As Florida anticipates the changes expected by 2030 and beyond, it will be crucial that we work towards forward-looking land use and design decisions that:

  • Promote sustainable urban and rural development practices that make more efficient use of land and infrastructure and protect natural resources,
  • Invest in land preservation efforts to ensure protection of essential habitat, water resources, recreational, agricultural, forestry, and other resource lands, and
  • Encourage communities and regions to participate in long range visioning activities that link economic development, land use, infrastructure, community planning, and environmental stewardship decisions.

For information on preparing Florida’s infrastructure for smart growth and development, download the Florida 2030 Key Targets & Strategies by visiting www.Florida2030.org


 

Resources

Florida Department of Economic Opportunity Community Planning, Development and Services

Florida Natural Areas Inventory

A Guide to Global Trade

 

Learn More About Global Trade   Join a Caucus

 

By 2030, six million more residents will call Florida home and two million more jobs will be needed. International trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) play a significant role in fueling Florida’s economic and job growth engine. In order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skilled talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 report.

 

Resources

Florida Trade and Logistics Study (2010)

Florida Chamber of Commerce Trade & Logistics Institute – established by the Florida Chamber to connect Florida’s business community to global opportunities and to leverage resources and investments to maintain and expand Florida’s position as an international trade leader.

What Are the Impacts of Global Trade to Florida’s Economy?

Florida is made for trade; and trade equals jobs in the Sunshine State. So why don’t you hear more about the impact of global trade? This FloridaWins.org video shows why you should care about international trade and business in Florida.

Governor and Cabinet Proclaim May as Florida World Trade Month

Florida Chamber, Trade Partners Champion Trade’s Role in Florida’s Economy

Governor Rick Scott and members of the Florida Cabinet today declared May as World Trade Month in Florida, presenting a resolution designating this honor to the Florida Chamber of Commerce.

Global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity, and increasingly, is one of Florida’s top strategies for economic diversification and long-term growth. From small business exporters and manufacturers to global service providers, Florida wins when we remain committed to Florida’s trade future.

ECONOMIC IMPACT OF TRADE:

  • International business accounts for about 16 percent of Florida’s economy,
  • International trade supports more than 2.5 million Florida jobs, and
  • 61,000 companies in Florida export products or services.

We will be discussing these economic impacts and more at the Florida Chamber’s Florida International Trade & Investment Conference in Miami on May 16-17. Be sure to register today and join international leaders as they discuss what businesses in Florida need to know to remain globally competitive.

Florida is the 3rd Largest Exporter of High-Tech Goods in the U.S.

When people think of Florida-based exports, they tend to think of agricultural products like fruits, sugar, vegetables and other commodities. However, 92 percent of Florida-origin exports are manufactured goods, which create high-skill, high-paying jobs for Floridians and contribute $53.8 billion to Florida’s economy. High-tech products, in particular, accounted for nearly 1 in 4 of Florida’s exports in 2014 and contributed $13.9 billion a year to Florida’s export market, making Florida the 3rd largest exporter of high-tech goods in the nation.

Intl Trade Infographic_572

With research from the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade & Logistics Study 2.0 showing that 95 percent of the world’s consumers live outside the U.S., what is your business doing to diversify into new markets and become globally competitive?

 

 

Florida Chamber Embarks on Trade Mission to South Korea and Taiwan

Goal is to Enhance Trade Between Florida and These Important Trading Partners

TALLAHASSEE, FL (April 18, 2016) – To strengthen Florida’s competitive edge in the global economy, the Florida Chamber of Commerce this week is participating in an economic trade mission to South Korea and Taiwan – meeting with international leaders to continue growing trade between Florida and these important trading partners.

While there, David Hart, Executive Vice President for the Florida Chamber, will address dignitaries and business leaders and showcase the Florida marketplace. The trade mission is being led by Enterprise Florida, Inc.

According to Alice Ancona, Director of Global Outreach for the Florida Chamber of Commerce, global trade is big business in Florida. That’s because 95 percent of the world’s consumers, who also hold 80 percent of the global purchasing power, are outside the United States.

“International trade allows Florida companies to reach these consumers and helps our state create jobs and economic opportunity, and remain the global hub for trade and logistics. By joining Enterprise Florida on this Export Development Trade Mission, we are able to share why international matters to Florida,” Ancona said.

The Florida Chamber has remained committed to ensuring Free Trade Agreements (FTA) are in place to help create greater economic opportunities, that includes lobbying in Washington, D.C. for the Korea-U.S. FTA of 2012. Currently, Florida exports more than $702 million in commodities to South Korea, and imports $1.9 billion. Florida also enjoys a unique trade relationship with Taiwan that includes exporting $238 million in commodities.

“Building relationships in emerging and growing global economies is an essential tool for Florida to remain competitive,” said Jim Pyburn, Director of Business Development for Port Everglades. “Here in South Korea and Taiwan, we are getting a hands-on look at just how beneficial these relationships can be.”

Florida’s record investments in transportation and infrastructure make it the ideal place to leverage and grow trade and logistics opportunities. Consider the following:

Florida’s freight system moves 740 million tons of freight annually, including international imports and exports, domestic movements to and from other states, and internal shipments within Florida,
Air Cargo generates 36 percent of Florida’s international trade dollars,
Miami International Airport is number one in the U.S. for international freight, and
Four of Florida’s ports are considered the fastest growing in the U.S.: Miami, Palm Beach, Everglades and JAXPORT.

“International Trade is critical to Florida’s global economy, and our freight infrastructure is a key asset in attracting that trade to our state,” said Doug Wheeler, President and CEO of the Florida Ports Council. “Current investments in upgrades and expansions for our state’s ports and freight corridors will ensure that Florida exports can quickly and efficiently get to countries around the world like South Korea and Taiwan.”

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Florida Senate Passes Resolution in Support of Trade Partnerships

In a move to signal Florida’s support of increased trade with Europe, the Florida Senate has passed a resolution that will support the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP), a valuable trade agreement between the United States and European Union.

SB 1776, sponsored by Senator Garrett Richter (R-Naples), supports the negotiations, which if successful, will create the world’s largest free trade zone, accounting for 60 percent of global production.

Free Trade Agreements (FTA) have been a positive force for economic development and Florida has much to gain from these negotiations. In fact, 17 percent of Florida’s economy is dependent on free trade.

We commend Sen. Richter and the Florida Senate for their commitment to making Florida a leader in global trade. The Florida Chamber will continue to keep you up-to-date with the latest news on trade negotiations and opportunities for Florida companies to expand their business abroad.

Learn More About the Impacts of Global Trade in Florida

India and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) launched an initiative, ‘India and APEC: Charting a Path to Membership,’ to develop the case and a strategy for gaining India’s membership in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). The ASPI initiative will be supported in India by leading business association Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).

Joining APEC would be a game-changer for India and would position it for integration into global supply chains as well as serve as a bridge to one day joining the TPP.

India is Asia’s third largest economy and its participation in APEC would be a win for India and the region, particularly at a time when China’s economy is slowing down.  India’s entry will require it to update its policy and regulatory environment preparing it for greater market access and trade liberalization in order to fully participate in the global market place.

APEC had a moratorium on new membership for a decade, which has now been lifted.

APEC’s members include the U.S., Russia, China, Australia and Japan. It represents 2.8 billion people and accounts for 57 percent of the world’s gross domestic product and 47 percent of global trade.

What Does This Mean for Florida?

While India is not one of Florida’s top trading partners, its potential is tremendous.  Its large economy still remains a “sleeping giant” as it has not fully integrated into the global market place and still lacks critical infrastructure investments to maximize capacity and stimulate business growth. India’s integration into APEC could open doors for greater market access to U.S./Florida exporters and businesses looking to tap into its potential. Relationship building is important for Florida to be at the forefront of an emerging powerhouse that is India poised to become.

 

Learn More:

In order to remain globally competitive, Florida needs to diversity our trading partners and markets to expand and grow Florida trade.  This is a strategy identified in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics study. To learn more about how the Florida Chamber is work to build Florida’s international relationships, contact Alice Ancona today at aancona@flchamber.com.

Florida Chamber’s International Days Focuses on Making Florida More Competitive

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Edie Ousley, 850-521-1231 or 850-251-6261
eousley@flchamber.com

Global Economic Opportunities Takes Center Stage

TALLAHASSEE, FL. (April 8, 2015) – International businesses leaders joined forces today at the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s International Days to focus on making Florida more competitive through global economic opportunities. Leaders from Shanghai to Canada, representatives from Fortune 500 companies and Florida’s 15 deep water seaports, the state’s leading economic development and transportation agencies are taking part in the state’s premier international event.

Global trade is big business in Florida. International business and foreign direct investments accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity and supports more than one million Florida jobs. Florida is also home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe – many of them small to medium sized businesses.

“It’s Florida’s time because we are in the right position, we have the right culture, we have the right infrastructure,” said Lee Sandler, chair of the Florida Chamber’s International Business Council. “So Florida, and Floridian companies, are really in a position to take advantage of the global economy in ways we didn’t have available before.”

In Florida, global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity. According to a recent Florida Chamber Foundation Did You Know, Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.

Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson kicked-off the two-day event, and additional speakers will include Secretary of Transportation Jim Boxold, along with keynote speakers: Fredrik Eliasson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, CSX Transportation, and John Murphy, Senior Vice President for International Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

A complete line up of panels and speakers is located here.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Florida Chamber Kicks Off International Days 2015

Florida Chamber’s International Days Focuses on Making Florida More Competitive
Global Economic Opportunities Takes Center Stage

International businesses leaders joined forces today at the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s International Days to focus on making Florida more competitive through global economic opportunities. Leaders from Shanghai to Canada, representatives from Fortune 500 companies and Florida’s 15 deep water seaports, the state’s leading economic development and transportation agencies are taking part in the state’s premier international event.

Florida Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson spoke to a packed house at the 2015 Florida Chamber International Days event in Tallahassee, FL.

Global trade is big business in Florida. International business and foreign direct investments accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity and supports more than one million Florida jobs. Florida is also home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe – many of them small to medium sized businesses.

“It’s Florida’s time because we are in the right position, we have the right culture, we have the right infrastructure,” said Lee Sandler, chair of the Florida Chamber’s International Business Council. “So Florida, and Floridian companies, are really in a position to take advantage of the global economy in ways we didn’t have available before.”

In Florida, global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity. According to a recent Florida Chamber Foundation Did You Know, Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.

Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson kicked-off the two-day event, and additional speakers will include Secretary of Transportation Jim Boxold, along with keynote speakers: Fredrik Eliasson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, CSX Transportation, and John Murphy, Senior Vice President for International Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

A complete line up of panels and speakers is located here.

Follow the Event Online:

Be sure to visit the Florida Chamber’s Facebook and Twitter pages to see and read what’s happening at the event, or search for #intldays15

A Global Economy Means Opportunities for Florida’s Future

Florida’s economy is moving in the right direction again. Recent polls from the Florida Chamber’s Political Institute confirm that likely voters remain confident in our economy’s recovery. But while our state is moving in the right direction, we are at a pivotal turning point. Florida is now moving towards becoming the hub for global trade.

For Keiser University, a global economy equals opportunities for Florida’s future talent and workforce. By providing degree programs in Florida, and in China and Nicaragua, we are providing educational opportunities and options to students who will move our state, and the world, forward. For over 40 years, included in the University’s mission is a focus on preparing students to effectively compete, lead and serve in Florida and the global marketplace.  We must continue to work towards attracting and retaining the best talent we can to Florida. And we must do this in high wage fields, which will help diversify Florida’s economy. Our state has a strong foundation in tourism and agriculture, but we can now build on foundation by providing opportunities for innovation, STEM, research and development and more.

At Keiser, we believe closing the talent gap is key to sustained economic development. And what better way to grow, than to grow globally?

To get involved with the Florida Chamber’s global efforts, contact Alice Ancona at aancona@flchamber.com.

Written by Belinda Keiser, Vice Chancellor, Keiser University

Team Florida Prepares For Economic Mission Trip to Panama

Global trade is now, more than ever, at the forefront of Florida’s recovering economy. we cannot deny that global trade is big business in Florida. Global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity for Florida. The Sunshine State is home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe. International business and foreign direct investment accounts for approximately 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity, and directly supports more than one million Florida jobs.

Solidifying Florida’s position as a global hub for trade is a key strategic initiative of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. Florida has long been an important consumer market and a gateway for trade between the United States and Latin American and Caribbean nations.

With the expansion of the Panama Canal and the Free Trade Agreement, Panama presents Florida companies tremendous opportunities. The Florida Chamber Foundation’s original Trade and Logistics Study (2010), identified the Panama Canal expansion as a seminal moment and called for our state to take advantage of this once-in-a-generation opportunity to invest in ports and infrastructure. Governor Rick Scott and the legislature stepped-up with significant investments, and now Florida is poised to have the first port south of Virginia, PortMiami, that can receive the post-Panamax ships that will be coming from Asia through the Canal.

Post-Panamax vessels are nearly three times the size as current vessels being used. Florida’s gateways are better prepared at being able to facilitate the trade relationship between Florida and Panama.

Currently, Panama is one of the strongest economies in Latin America. The country boasts the second fastest growing GDP in the region, expected to reach a 6 percent growth in 2015. Total merchandise trade between Florida and Panama totaled $2.3 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow.

For these reasons, the Florida Chamber of Commerce- lead by Florida Secretary of Commerce Gray Swoope- will be joining partners Port Tampa Bay, Gulf Power, Keiser University, Port Miami, Tampa Hillsborough EDC, Bank of America, St Joe Company, Port Everglades, Tampa International Airport Florida Department of Transportation Secretary Ananth Prasad, and Doug Wheeler of Florida Ports Council on an Export Sales Mission to Panama October 5-7.

The widening of the Panama Canal, together with the growth in Latin American and Caribbean markets, will realign global trade lanes and increase flows through this region in the coming decades.

Today the state of Florida is a global hub for trade. It took decades of innovative efforts, resourcefulness and entrepreneurship from the private sector, strategic investments from the public sector and capitalizing on opportunities like free trade agreements and the expansion of the Panama Canal to claim this title.

Florida’s international relationships are invaluable to our economy. By working to create opportunities with nations like Panama, and fueling massive economic development projects like the Panama Canal expansion and the dredging of PortMiami, we can diversify our own economy and fuel long-term investments by global businesses. Everything we do, we do on a global scale.

Florida’s future prosperity and our growth as a global hub for international trade are inextricably linked. In order for Florida to continue on its mission to be a global hub for trade, the business community must unite and policymakers must remain committed to Florida’s trade future. We hope you will save the date for International Days 2015, April 7-9. Contact aancona@flchamber.com for more information.