More Regulations Bad for Rail Industry

 

Download Letter to Transportation Committee      Register for Transportation Summit     Transportation Investments

 

Florida Should Welcome All Modes of Transportation

In testimony before the Florida Senate Transportation Committee, the Florida Chamber of Commerce expressed its opposition to SB 572, which would add unneeded state regulations to the already heavily federally regulated rail industry.

The Florida Chamber believes this bill will disturb existing agreements between local governments and private companies, and discourage private investment that seeks to solve public transportation issues.

During testimony to the committee, which is chaired by Senator George B. Gainer (R-Panama City), we shared that Florida will see an additional 5.4 million residents and 117 million annual visitors by 2030. Florida should welcome all modes of transportation, especially those the private sector is willing to invest in.

Click here to see Chris Emmanuel’s testimony in front of the Florida Senate Transportation Committee.

 

Share Your Feedback

We welcome your feedback on this issue. Join the discussion at the 2017 Florida Chamber Foundation Transportation Solutions Summit on December 12. For additional information, email Chris Emmanuel at cemmanuel@flchamber.com or call at (850) 521-1242.

Florida Chamber Foundation Chief Economist Provides Look at Future of Florida’s Workforce

 

Read Testimony   Read the Report: Florida Jobs 2030    The Florida Scorecard

 

This morning, Dr. Jerry Parrish joined the Florida House Post-Secondary Education Subcommittee to discuss the future of Florida’s workforce and the Florida Chamber Foundation’s recent report- Florida Jobs 2030. Click here to read Dr. Jerry Parrish’s full testimony.

What does the future of Florida’s talent, workforce and skills look like?

By 2030, Florida will add six million more residents and will need to create 2 million net new jobs. At the same time, rapid innovation technology will drive increased automation, globalization, digitization, and advances in machine learning in the next decade and a half.

While these shifts are already well underway, by 2030 these and other disruptive technologies will lead to the development of new jobs and a shift in the skills and competencies required for existing jobs within the state’s economy. Though many of the jobs Floridians will hold in 2030 have not yet emerged, Florida has a strategic opportunity to prepare for these shifts by leveraging its many assets and changing demographics to make decisions that will have generational benefits and create economic opportunity for millions of Floridians.

Read the Report and Share Your Thoughts

Florida Jobs 2030 is an analysis of the state’s 21st-century jobs. This analysis draws on labor market research and qualitative interviews with more than 90 stakeholders from Florida’s business, education, nonprofit, and workforce communities to examine these 21st-century jobs, the skills required to perform them, and anticipated gaps in the labor market. Click here to read the report and tell us your thoughts on where Florida’s workforce future is headed.

Learn More

During the Florida Chamber Foundation’s 2017 Future of Florida Forum, education, workforce and economic development leaders dedicated an entire morning to discussing how Florida can be ready for the future of workforce. During that event, the Florida Chamber Foundation also unveiled Florida’s newest education website, Launch My Career Florida.

A talented workforce is Florida’s best long-term economic strategy, and businesses around the state agree that talent is quickly replacing the tax incentive as the economic tool of choice. There are several ways you can continue the conversation:

Testimony on Florida Jobs 2030

 

Download a PDF      Download the Presentation    Read the Report: Florida Jobs 2030

 

 

 

ON:            Florida Jobs 2030

TO:             House Post-Secondary Education Subcommittee

BY:             Jerry Parrish, Ph.D., Chief Economist, Florida Chamber Foundation

DATE:       October 11, 2017


Good afternoon Madam Chairman and members of the committee.  I am Dr. Jerry Parrish – I am the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the Florida Chamber Foundation.

Today I’ve been asked to discuss our recent report called Florida Jobs 2030This report is available to everyone for free – at www.theFloridaChamber.com

Before I do that I want to remind the Committee that we have online The Florida Scorecard.

On it we track the metrics that are important to Florida’s Future.  We have data at the State level as you see here, and we have it for every county in Florida.  There are hundreds of thousands of data points available for use by everyone – all of it is Free to use.   Because we believe that we can track Florida’s progress through the use of the right metrics.

For each of Florida’s 6 Pillars there is additional data.  Here you see the metrics for our Talent Supply and Education pillar.  You may notice the color scheme – if it’s green it means we’re going in the right direction.  Red means we’re not – and the light blue means we had no change.

The Florida Chamber Foundation has been doing research a long time.  In the nearly 49 year history of the Chamber Foundation, we have produced many research reports that have led to good policy actions by the Florida Legislature.

Our latest report is called Florida Jobs 2030.

The Chamber Foundation is thankful for the support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for this project.

In this report, more than 90 stakeholders from all areas of Florida were interviewed.

Included:

  1. Private-sector companies, both large and small businesses
  2. Professionals involved in career training and development
  3. State college, and state university leaders
  4. Economic Development Professionals
  5. Non-profit leaders
  6. Many local chambers of commerce
  7. Foundations who work in this field
  8. Association partners of the Chamber Foundation

Results from these hundreds of hours of interviews were combined with quantitative data on the number of jobs available in categories chosen for their growth potential in this state and their ability to provide high-wage jobs and career options for Florida families.

In the report, we detail the 5 Target Industries that we expect to grow the most, and produce the most high-wage jobs for Florida between now and the year 2030.  These categories include:

  1. Aerospace and Aviation
  2. Health Care & Life Sciences
  3. Manufacturing
  4. Finance and Professional Services
  5. Logistics & Distribution

For each of these industries, we note the entry-level, middle-skill, and high-skill jobs available in the career lattice – and what qualifications someone would need to get these differing skill jobs.  This one for Aerospace and Aviation shows potential paths of how someone could get into the industry and progress as they obtain higher skills.

This slide shows the Logistics and Distribution Cluster – and you may remember that with the Chamber Foundation’s Trade & Logistics Studies – both 1 and 2 – this is something we have been doing research on for a long time.

For each of the 5 target industries, we show the specific jobs, their current employment, expected growth, median wage and the education required for an entry-level position.

This slide shows the 2 industry clusters expected to grow the fastest in the upcoming years.  As in the other 3, the report provides detailed job projections, the entry, middle- and high-skill jobs that are expected to grow as well as the salaries that are possible.

You know, people often ask me how our research is being used.  I am pleased to say that we not only has CareerSource Florida been using our research, we also have Florida’s State College System using our report to align their curriculum to what Florida needs to secure its future.  Just last week the Florida College System hosted a 2-day convening of leadership teams from all of its 28 colleges that I participated in – along with economists from Florida’s Department of Economic Opportunity and CareerSource Florida.  In it the college leadership team reviewed how their College was meeting the talent needs of local businesses in these 5 target industries.  This will align Florida’s talent supply with the expected growth in these industries that diversify Florida’s economy and create high-wage jobs.

I would like to take this time to remind the Committee that this report is part of the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Florida 2030 Project. 

Our organization has visited all 67 counties in Florida and discussed Florida’s future with more than 10,000 people for the Florida 2030 project, developing a strategic plan for our state – discussing Florida’s future and what we need to do to prepare.  You will see that report around March 2018.

Finally – I want to let you know that the Florida Chamber Foundation partnered with the U.S. Chamber on a website called Launch My Career.  We help a press conference at our Future of Florida Forum.  It is a website that people can go to and get information on potential careers, what the demand is expected to be and what the pay is.  You can find that website at www.LaunchMyCareerFL.org

Thank you Madam Chairman and the Committee for allowing me to present today – I will be glad to answer any questions that you may have.

Thank you.

 

 

Florida Chamber President Provides Hurricane Irma Economic Outlook During Testimony Before Senate Commerce Committee

 

Read Testimony   Fight AOB Fraud    Local Chamber Relief Fund

 

In a testimony before the Florida Senate Commerce Committee, Florida Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Mark Wilson told lawmakers that Florida will rebound from Irma.

During his remarks to the committee, which is chaired by Senator Bill Montford (D-Tallahassee), Wilson encouraged lawmakers to focus on continuous improvement and to join forces with the private sector to help secure Florida’s future.  Click here to read Wilson’s testimony.

Irma yielded the largest evacuation in U.S. history, and as Wilson explained, there’s no question we’ll learn lessons from this storm. From an economic outlook perspective, Wilson testified that:

  • Tax revenue likely won’t keep up with storm expenses,
  • Job growth will continue to slow,
  • A gap in skilled labor – particularly for home repairs and rebuilding – will hurt in the short-term, and
  • Lawsuit chasers, as highlighted in the Wall Street Journal, “are trying to milk the public’s pain for their own gain.” Wilson encouraged lawmakers to side with consumers in frivolous class action claims.

Looking forward, he applauded state leaders for making smart public policy decisions to reduce exposure and spread risk in Citizens Property Insurance and Florida’s CAT Fund. However, he warned that the tsunami of assignment of benefit-related claims that have flooded the market – unrelated to Hurricane Irma – are causing property insurance rates to skyrocket. He encouraged lawmakers to make meaningful reforms this session.

Wilson was joined on the panel by partners in Florida’s business community, including:

  • Cissy Proctor, Executive Director, Florida Department of Economic Opportunity
  • Ken Lawson, President & CEO, VISIT FLORIDA
  • Michelle Dennard, President and CEO, CareerSource Florida
  • Cheryl Kirby, Associate State Director, Florida SBDC
  • Lance Lozano, Chief Operating Officer, Florida United Business Association

 

Call on the Legislature to Fight AOB Fraud

Fight back against the growing storm of assignment of benefits fraud. Sign the petition and call on the Legislature to stop this “Category 5 hurricane.”

 

Support Local Chambers in Need

Support local chambers in need of relief following Hurricane Irma by contributing to the Florida Chamber Local Chamber Relief Fund.

Breaking the Cycle of Generational Poverty

This weekend, Mark Wilson, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce, discussed the importance of economic opportunity for all Floridians during a presentation at Leadership Florida.

While Florida is creating 1 out of every 10 new jobs in the U.S., and is lowering taxes and creating greater economic opportunities, 1 in every 6 Floridians live in poverty and more than 1 million households live below the federal poverty line in our state.

Earlier this year, during testimony before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Human Resources, Wilson urged Congress to seek ways to end generational poverty by lifting up Americans through economic opportunity instead of entitlements.

“In my view, the battle of this generation is between economic equality and economic opportunity – between those who believe that everyone is entitled to equal outcomes and those who believe everyone should have an equal opportunity at earned success,” said Mark Wilson, President and CEO, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

WATCH: Florida Chamber President Urges Congress to Begin Breaking The Cycle of Generational Poverty Through Economic Opportunity

 

Read the Congressional Testimony

 

“The battle of this generation is between economic equality and economic opportunity – between those who believe that everyone is entitled to prosperity and those who believe everyone is entitled to the opportunity to succeed,” said MARK WILSON, President and CEO, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 1, 2016) – While voters in 11 states are casting ballots for their preferred presidential candidate today, Mark Wilson, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce took to Capitol Hill to encourage the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means, Subcommittee on Human Resources to seek ways to end generational poverty by lifting up Americans through economic opportunity instead of entitlements.

Watch the Full Testimony by Mark Wilson, President and CEO, Florida Chamber of Commerce

 

Congressman Vern Buchanan asks, “What Can Florida do?”

Florida Chamber President Urges Congress to Begin Breaking The Cycle of Generational Poverty Through Economic Opportunity

“The battle of this generation is between economic equality and economic opportunity – between those who believe
that everyone is entitled to prosperity and those who believe everyone is entitled to the opportunity to succeed.”

– Mark Wilson, President and CEO, Florida Chamber of Commerce

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. (March 1, 2016) – While voters in 11 states are casting ballots for their preferred presidential candidate today, Mark Wilson, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce took to Capitol Hill to encourage the U.S. House Committee on Ways and Means, Subcommittee on Human Resources to seek ways to end generational poverty by lifting up Americans through economic opportunity instead of entitlements.

“The battle of this generation is between economic equality and economic opportunity – between those who believe that everyone is entitled to prosperity and those who believe everyone is entitled to the opportunity to succeed,” Mark Wilson said during testimony before the Congressional Committee.

As Wilson explained, there will always be poverty, the kind that results from temporary setbacks such as job loss, foreclosures, or unexpected challenges, and the Florida Chamber believes social safety nets are needed and necessary to help bridge a family back to a productive “work based solution.”

“While sometimes necessary, certain entitlement programs can have the unintended consequences of creating dependency, exacerbating the underlying issues and enabling a system that keeps those within it captive, unable to climb out,” Wilson explained. “We can break this cycle and create greater opportunities for the next generation by removing the shackles of government entitlement programs that are holding the poorest of the poor back, incorporating greater educational opportunities and allowing free enterprise to create more private-sector jobs. We can make generational poverty a thing of the past and the American Dream of economic freedom a reality.”

To break the cycle, Wilson urges Members of Congress to focus on closing the education gap and increasing workforce training and work based solutions.

“Jobs and education create equal opportunity and hope for all Floridians, including our most vulnerable residents. Florida’s business leaders have accepted the challenge to focus on prosperity as an economic driver and find solutions to curb generational poverty. If we are going to help solve the poverty problem, leadership must come from the business community, not just the tax base,” Wilson told members of the congressional committee.

The House Ways and Means Subcommittee is Chaired by Congressman Vern Buchanan, a former Florida Chamber Chair. This is the first committee meeting of the House Ways and Means Subcommittee that Congressman Buchanan is chairing.

Read Mark Wilson’s comments to the House Ways and Means Subcommittee by clicking here.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.