A Talented Workforce and the Rising Probability of a Recession Leave Florida’s Small Businesses Feeling Uncertain

Latest Florida Chamber of Commerce Small Business Index Survey Shows

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (July 22, 2019)— While Florida’s small businesses continue boosting the state’s economy, finding qualified workers to fill available jobs tops the list of issues keeping small business owners up at night, survey results from the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Third Quarter Small Business Index Survey show. 

“Florida’s small businesses continue to be concerned about being able to hire a talented workforce,” said Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist and Director of Research at the Florida Chamber Foundation. “Improving Florida’s talent pipeline for a better workforce will help ensure jobs have talented employees, and will help put workers on the path to prosperity – leading goals of Florida 2030, Florida’s next strategic plan.”

Concerns over a likely recession are also creating economic uncertainty among job creators, the survey shows. However, while Florida’s small businesses are cautious, the state’s economy is healthy and expanding. Florida is now the 18th most diversified economy in the country, and there are rising numbers of open jobs and a declining amount of people looking for jobs.

The Florida Chamber’s third quarterly statewide Small Business Index Survey shows small businesses are most concerned about:

  1. Workforce Quality – 27%

2. Economic Uncertainty – 12%

3. Growth Management Process – 8%

4. Government Regulations – 7%

5. Healthcare Costs – 7%

Of Florida’s small businesses, 47 percent of respondents expect the economy to improve, down from 57 percent one year ago and 70 percent two years ago. They also felt that a positive indicator for businesses is that 24 percent of respondents thought it would be easier to get financing in the next six months, compared to 15 percent in last quarter’s survey.

“Florida’s economy is dependent on the small business community, and the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council remains committed to advocating on their behalf,” said Glenda Hood, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and President, Hood Partners LLC.

About the Survey:

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically June 6 through July 5, 2019. Fifty-six of respondents employ less than five employees, while 32 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click HERE to view the full report.

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Florida Chamber Bottom Line: Addressing Florida’s Skills Gap with WGU

 

Register for Learners to Earners Workforce Summit     Education Issue Page

 

Addressing Florida’s Skills Gap with WGU

The latest Florida Chamber Bottom Line, features Scott Pulsipher, President of Western Governors University to discuss the future of work and address Florida’s growing skills gap.

“Sixty-four percent of jobs in Florida are going to require post-secondary credentials of some sort in the future, but the reality is, like the rest of the nation, only 40 percent of adults today in the workforce have those credentials,” said Pulsipher. “So, there is a gap between what the skills and capabilities are going to be needed for the future and the total percent of the workforce in Florida that have those skills and capabilities.”

 

Is Florida’s Workforce Ready?

Join business leaders, industry experts, elected officials and community leaders at the Florida Chamber Foundation’s 2019 Learners to Earners Workforce Summit. There you’ll be able to hear from and network with industry leaders looking for talent and those tasked with ensuring Florida’s students are ready for the future of work.

Closing Florida’s Talent Gap by Improving Educational Opportunities

 

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Why It Matters to Florida

From local businesses to major corporations, a qualified workforce is a top concern for job creators. To secure Florida’s future, employers need talent that is prepared to enter the workforce. Florida wins when we close the gap by putting students ahead of special interests. The Florida Chamber will continue to champion the best education system for Florida.

The Florida Chamber’s focus includes:

  •  Preparing Students for Success
  • Innovation and Outcomes Are Essential
  • Quality School Choice Matters
  • Improving Attainment and Access to Higher Education
  • Preparing Florida’s Workforce to Address Florida’s Skills Gap

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

  • Preparing Students for Success
    Ensuring a talented workforce for tomorrow begins with empowering our youngest learners today. Preparing children to learn provides a foundation for future successes and helps them develop skills such as self-discipline, persistence and cooperation-skills that re essential to their future success in the workforce.
  • Innovation and Outcomes Are Essential
    The Florida Chamber understands the importance of STEMM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, Medicine) education in schools. We will continue to support a focus on STEMM concepts throughout Florida’s education system in order to ensure that Florida’s students become and remain globally competitive.
  • Quality School Choice Matters
    At the Florida Chamber we recognize that education is not a one-size-fits-all option. We continue to advocate for parents to have the freedom to choose the best learning environment for their children .
  • Preparing Florida’s Workforce to Address Florida’s Skills Gap
    Advocating for increased attainment and making college more affordable is a top priority for the Florida Chamber. In addition to adequately preparing Florida’s students to enter the workforce, we must also focus on attracting and retaining world class talent.
  • Improving Attainment and Access to Higher Education
    In order for Florida to remain one of the top business climates in the nation, we must increase educational opportunities in both higher education and in the 21st century vocational trades.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

We believe that a quality education and workforce development system is the best way to enable Floridians to compete in a 21st century global economy. Be a part of the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Business Alliance for Early Learning and help us invest in the future of Florida’s students.

 

Strengthening Florida’s Leadership in Space Exploration

 

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Why It Matters to Florida

As NASA’s role continues to evolve private aerospace companies are playing increasingly important roles in space exploration. Florida must aggressively compete to remain the preeminent location for spaceflight activities, engage in more research and development and capitalize and grow Florida’s existing space industry talent supply. Florida’s aerospace industry helps to generate bold economic development initiatives and brings much needed jobs not only to Florida’s Space Coast, but throughout Florida.

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

The Florida Chamber will continue to push for targeted investments in technological advancements for both civil and commercial space projects, and ensure that Florida maintains its leadership role in space. The Florida Chamber will also continue to advocate for initiatives that fund aviation improvements and grow our highly skilled and educated aerospace workforce. Encouraging targeted investments in technological advancements for both civil and commercial space projects ensures Florida remains the leader in America’s space business.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

With new programs and innovations bringing life back to Florida’s Space Coast, the Florida Chamber remains committed to strengthening Florida’s leadership in space exploration by supporting growing public and commercial space initiatives, and investing and growing skilled aerospace workforce.

Act Now

Add your voice to those who support innovative growth in Florida’s aviation and aerospace industries by joining the Florida Chamber in our fight to secure Florida’s future.

Growing Florida’s Manufacturing Industry

 

Download One Pager    Learn More About Manufacturing    Trade & Logistics 2.0 Report

 

Why It Matters to Florida

Did you know manufacturing contributes more than $40 billion to Florida’s economy?

In fact, manufacturing jobs are estimated to grow by four percent by 2021 and for every 10 jobs created in Florida’s export-oriented manufacturing, 12 more jobs are created in transportation, warehousing and retail. Florida has more than 360,000 manufacturing employees earning, on average, more than $54,000 annually, which is higher than the state’s average wage.

The impact of manufacturing on Florida’s global economy is significant. Growing Florida’s manufacturing industry is essential, especially as Florida continues to be a global hub for trade. Florida’s manufacturing industry provides more than 92 percent of Florida exports and creates private-sector jobs while diversifying Florida’s economy.

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

The impact that the manufacturing industry has on Florida is undeniable. In order to help continue growing Florida’s manufacturing industry, the Florida Chamber will continue to champion efforts that support Florida’s manufacturing industry. The Florida Chamber is committed to following the recommendations in the Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report, which seeks to create 150,000 new jobs in industries like trade, logistics, manufacturing and exporting.

As Florida’s economy moves toward innovation and high wage, high-value jobs in emerging industries, we must have the workforce ready to fill these new positions. With 265,200 jobs looking for people and 369,000 people looking for jobs, the problem isn’t workforce quantity, it’s workforce quality. A strong pool of globally competitive employees will be a powerful lure for businesses who hope to prosper in our state. Together we can ensure Florida remains a leader in producing a talented workforce for every industry.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

Florida continues to move in the right direction by growing private-sector jobs, expanding new industries and strengthening international trade and logistics relationships. But our work is far from over. The Florida Chamber believes a globally competitive business climate helps businesses and families succeed. But in order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skill talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics Report.

Act Now

For more information on Trade and Logistics 2.0 recommendations or to engage your business in our international efforts, contact Alice Ancona at aancona@flchamber.com.

Florida Chamber Series on Free Enterprise: Amendment Two

 

Constitutional Amendments     2018 Election Center

 

Robert Weissert of Florida TaxWatch: “Amendment 2 is Important for Everyone”

In the latest edition of the Florida Chamber Series on Free Enterprise, Robert Weissert, Executive Vice President of Florida TaxWatch, discusses Amendment 2 and its impact on all Floridians.

“It would be a major concern if this goes down because it’s the only protection in the constitution for non-homesteaded property, so we would see significant iniquity in the property tax system but more importantly we would see negative effects on Florida’s economy,” said Weissert.

Click Below to Listen to Robert Weissert.

 

 

 

Vote “YES ON 2” This November

If Amendment 2 passes it will not only help Florida’s families and job creators but aid Florida’s economy.  Learn more about Amendment 2 here or get involved at www.Everybodyisfor2.com.

 

Florida Chamber Series on Free Enterprise: Featuring Kevin Hyde, Foley & Lardner LLP

 

Learn More About Education     Register for the Future of Florida Forum

 

 

In the latest edition of the Florida Chamber Series on Free Enterprise, Kevin Hyde, Partner, Foley & Lardner LLP and interim president of Florida State College at Jacksonville, discusses workforce issues, including generational changes, the importance of skills development and training, and changes in workplace expectations.

“What we are seeing is an evolution of the types of skills that are needed within a community and how we as a state college and other training providers, provide those skills,” said Hyde. “Truly the way that people work is changing and that’s why the need for skills training is so important.”

Click Below to Listen to Kevin Hyde

 

What Will Talent Supply & Education Look Like in 2030?

Be sure to catch Kevin Hyde, Partner, Foley & Lardner LLP and interim president of Florida State College at Jacksonville, at the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Future of Florida Forum, September 26, 2018, as we discuss the future of talent and workforce in Florida.

Make Florida’s Workforce Globally Competitive

 
Learn More About Florida 2030 Continue the Conversation at the Future of Florida Forum
 

By: Doug Davidson, Market Executive for Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Chair of the Florida Chamber Foundation

Published in the Tampa Bay Times

If you aren’t amazed by the speed at which technology is changing our world, just think back 20 years. Would you have imagined cellphones with the capabilities of a laptop computer or the possibility of driverless vehicles roaming the streets of Tampa? Today’s world is dominated by innovation, guiding the creation of entirely new jobs and changing the way industries operate.

To compete in today’s global markets and build on our recent successes, Florida will need to think strategically about how to build success for 2030 and beyond. Florida’s workforce must be prepared for jobs that may not exist today and may require new skills and an entirely new way of thinking.

The Florida Chamber Foundation traveled to all 67 counties and heard from more than 10,000 Floridians as part of Florida 2030, a three-year, once-a-decade, blueprint for Florida’s future. Its findings echo the No. 1 concern of businesses — that in order to succeed, Florida must develop, attract and retain a globally oriented workforce.

The recommendations released at the foundation’s annual Learners to Earners Workforce Summit show that talent is the key currency of the future. Will Florida take advantage of the opportunities in the disruptions just around the corner or will we lag behind? The future depends on us making the right choice by investing in the young men and women who will lead us in the years ahead.
 

Get Involved

Visit www.Florida2030.org to download the Drivers for Florida’s Future report, which covers all Six Pillars of Florida’s growth, and learn how you can get involved.

Good Jobs for All Means Investing in Florida’s Workforce Colleges

Mark Wilson, Guest Columnist, Pensacola News Journal

As the president of the Florida Chamber of Commerce, my job is to listen to the concerns and needs of Florida employers and then share them with legislators and our governor. One of the biggest concerns I hear is that employers have jobs to fill, yet they cannot find all the talent they need.

Quarter after quarter, results from the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Small Business Index Survey show finding qualified employees as the top priority for employers across Florida. Right now, right here in Florida, despite a near record low unemployment, we have 261,600 jobs looking for people, and 374,000 people looking for jobs.

Workforce colleges are part of the solution to closing the skills gap, and Floridians need the legislature to follow Governor Scott’s lead and fully invest in the Florida College System.

To help close the gap, higher education institutions and workforce colleges are converting learners into earners. Florida’s universities, research institutions and career academies are preparing students with higher education for the workforce of tomorrow. Meanwhile, workforce colleges are training students – many of whom are economically disadvantaged, working adults and first-generation-in college students – with skills that match Florida jobs.Between now and 2030, two million more jobs will be needed in Florida. In fact, by 2030, 60 percent of jobs will require a post-secondary degree or advanced training.

And innovation and disruptive technologies are increasing the need for stronger skills. Many of these new jobs will require a shift in the skills and competencies of Florida’s workforce.

Simply put, talent is quickly replacing the tax incentive as Florida’s best economic development tool. But with lawmakers threatening to limit access to Florida’s workforce colleges and to cut funding that helps best match student interests with the right job skill training, you might not think improving educational opportunities in Florida is a priority of everyone in the Florida Legislature.

Job creators need our state legislature to put the long-term needs of Florida ahead of short-term fixes, and properly invest in Florida’s College System. Florida’s 28 workforce colleges develop and expand programs and certifications that directly speak to the workforce employment gaps in their region and produce the training and skills necessary to fill the voids.

Limiting investments and placing arbitrary caps on the number of students who can enroll in a workforce college will stifle a region’s ability to grow its labor force and prevent it from being a viable option for companies to relocate and call Florida home.

Florida should continue to strategically align the higher education systems to prepare for Florida’s future growth. By empowering Florida’s workforce colleges to foster innovative programs and certifications for targeted skills development, we can ensure the workforce pipeline will remain strong.

If you’re reading this and you want your kids and grandkids to live and work in Florida, please call your state legislator and ask them to do the right thing and fully fund Florida’s workforce colleges.

Mark Wilson is the president and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. He can be reached at mwilson@flchamber.com.

Florida Chamber Foundation Chief Economist Provides Look at Future of Florida’s Workforce

 

Read Testimony   Read the Report: Florida Jobs 2030    The Florida Scorecard

 

This morning, Dr. Jerry Parrish joined the Florida House Post-Secondary Education Subcommittee to discuss the future of Florida’s workforce and the Florida Chamber Foundation’s recent report- Florida Jobs 2030. Click here to read Dr. Jerry Parrish’s full testimony.

What does the future of Florida’s talent, workforce and skills look like?

By 2030, Florida will add six million more residents and will need to create 2 million net new jobs. At the same time, rapid innovation technology will drive increased automation, globalization, digitization, and advances in machine learning in the next decade and a half.

While these shifts are already well underway, by 2030 these and other disruptive technologies will lead to the development of new jobs and a shift in the skills and competencies required for existing jobs within the state’s economy. Though many of the jobs Floridians will hold in 2030 have not yet emerged, Florida has a strategic opportunity to prepare for these shifts by leveraging its many assets and changing demographics to make decisions that will have generational benefits and create economic opportunity for millions of Floridians.

Read the Report and Share Your Thoughts

Florida Jobs 2030 is an analysis of the state’s 21st-century jobs. This analysis draws on labor market research and qualitative interviews with more than 90 stakeholders from Florida’s business, education, nonprofit, and workforce communities to examine these 21st-century jobs, the skills required to perform them, and anticipated gaps in the labor market. Click here to read the report and tell us your thoughts on where Florida’s workforce future is headed.

Learn More

During the Florida Chamber Foundation’s 2017 Future of Florida Forum, education, workforce and economic development leaders dedicated an entire morning to discussing how Florida can be ready for the future of workforce. During that event, the Florida Chamber Foundation also unveiled Florida’s newest education website, Launch My Career Florida.

A talented workforce is Florida’s best long-term economic strategy, and businesses around the state agree that talent is quickly replacing the tax incentive as the economic tool of choice. There are several ways you can continue the conversation:

A Guide to Workforce

While Florida’s economy relies strongly upon the agricultural, tourism, and construction sectors as economic drivers, our state is ranked 24th nationally in industry diversification.  Strong growth is taking place in five of the state’s eight targeted industry clusters and these industries represent strong opportunities for middle-skill jobs and continued diversification.

Industry growth is being seen in aerospace and aviation; health care and life sciences; manufacturing; logistics and distribution; and financial and professional services. As Florida becomes more diversified, Florida businesses are experiencing a growing skills gap.

According to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity:

  • 248,300 positions remain open today (6/2017)
  • 67,000 of these are STEM-related jobs

As we look out to 2020, we must consider what our employment needs will be for our growing population.

According to the Florida Chamber Foundation, more than 894,000 jobs will be needed in Florida by 2020 in order to maintain a 6 percent unemployment rate, more if we want to improve beyond that. As we prepare for the future, we must decide today what type of economy we want for Florida residents and visitors. It is important that we look at the skill gaps in our workforce and put into place a plan to fill this gap. To continue on this same path could have a detrimental effect on Florida’s economy.

Changes in job requirements and new innovations are prompting many workers to think about lifetime commitments to ongoing job training. A new Pew Research Center survey finds many Americans see the need for ongoing training as essential to being successful and often go beyond what is required by their employers:

  • More than half of adults in the labor force say it will be essential for them to get training and develop new skills throughout their work life in order to keep up with changes in the workplace.
  • And 35 percent of workers, including about three-in-ten adults with at least a bachelor’s degree, say they don’t have the education and training they need to get ahead at work.

 

Resources

  • Pew Research Center
    The State of American Jobs – How the shifting economic landscape is reshaping work and society and affecting the way people think about the skills and training they need to get ahead

How Are Today’s Learners Preparing for the Workforce?

The articles and research below discuss alternatives  to academic undergraduate degrees. What do you think? Give us your opinion by completing the form below.

 

Good Jobs That Pay Without a BA

Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce

Although the decline in the manufacturing economy eliminated many good jobs for high school graduates, there are still 30 million good jobs in the U.S. that pay well without a BA. These good jobs have median earnings of $55,000 and are changing from traditional blue-collar industries to skilled-services industries.

 

Industrial Internship Gives Washington At-Risk Youth a Boost

U.S. News

Steven Jordan, Tanner Willman and Jessica White, who have full-time jobs at Northwest Motor Sales & Service in Longview, Washington, all got their start by landing paid internships at the company through a new program administered by Goodwill and Workforce Southwest Washington which helps to give local at-risk youth mentorship and exposure to industrial work skills often needed by employers in the area.

 

Are apprenticeships finally ready to take off in America?

AEIdeas

Imagine if worker education issues, such as apprenticeships and job retraining, received anywhere near the attention of “pro-growth” policies such as tax cuts or energy deregulation. Not only might there a better policy framework in place, but also more cultural acceptance of practical skills education vs. “college for all.”

 

An Overview of Non-degree Postsecondary Training

American Academy of Arts & Sciences

A new report offers an overview of non-degree postsecondary training, with a focus on five categories: certificate programs, work-based training (such as apprenticeships), skills-based short programs (coding boot camps), massive open online courses (MOOCs) and other online microcredentials, and competency-based education programs.

 

What role do internships, apprenticeships and other credentialing programs play in helping Florida’s future workforce prepare for tomorrow’s job needs? Are these types of programs helping your business meet its workforce needs?

What Does It Take To Work in Your Industry?
First
Last
Sending

 

 

Florida Small Businesses Increasingly Concerned Most About Workforce Quality and Government Regulations Latest Florida Chamber of Commerce Small Business Survey Shows

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (July 24, 2017) –  Workforce quality and government regulations are the top issues keeping Florida’s small business leaders up at night, according to the latest Florida Chamber of Commerce Small Business Index survey.

“In the span of two years, workforce quality has climbed from the fifth issue of greatest concern to the top issues of concern,” said DR. JERRY PARRISH, Chief Economist and Director of Research, Florida Chamber Foundation. “The Florida Chamber Foundation’s recent Florida Jobs 2030 report shows that the future of work is changing, and as this quarter’s Small Business Index shows, businesses – now more than ever – need access to a talented workforce.”

The Florida Chamber’s quarterly Small Business Index Statewide Survey Shows Small Businesses are Most Concerned About:

  • Workforce quality (23 percent),
  • Government regulations (16 percent),
  • Economic uncertainty (13 percent),
  • Healthcare costs (10 percent),
  • Lawsuit abuse (8 percent),
  • Access to capital (7 percent).

On the bright side, 70 percent of respondents expect their sales will increase over the next year.

“Florida’s small businesses continue to face a number of challenges, including increased concerns about workforce quality and government regulations,” said TAMI FITZPATRICK, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Entropy Technology Design, Inc. “The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council looks forward to working together to identify and support solutions that will help and grow Florida’s small business community.”

 

About the Survey:

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically June 29 through July 14, 2017. Twenty-nine percent of respondents employ less than five employees, while 42 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click here to view the full report.

 

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

CareerSource Florida President: Right Skills at the Right Time Matter

As the Florida Jobs 2030 report points out, industry input is key to Florida’s success. CareerSource Florida is holding workshops and has established leadership councils based around this report to “think about what the talent needs are for those industries that are so important to Florida’s economy.”

The Florida Chamber Foundation’s Chief Economist, Dr. Jerry Parrish, estimates that nearly 2 million net new jobs will need to be created between now and 2030. Florida’s workforce is key to ensuring a future that can create economic opportunities and jobs for all Floridians. That’s why a long-term lens on what workforce means to businesses in Florida is important.

As Dennard explains:

The CareerSource Florida network served over 80,000 businesses last year in recruiting, training and hiring needs. What we found, was that the need for businesses to have the right skills at the right time available to support their business is critical to moving Florida’s economy forward. Creating a long-term sustainable talent pipeline can move these opportunities from being transactional – or meeting the needs of an individual business— to transformational, changing the lives of Florida families and ensuring that sustainable talent pipeline for businesses.

You can be part of this conversation.

Register today to attend the Florida Chamber Foundation’s 2017 Learners to Earners Education Summit.

Building Florida’s Innovation Economy

 

Attracting and Retaining High-Skill Talent

 

Why It Matters to Florida

One of the most common concerns we hear from businesses of all sizes is the need for a qualified workforce and highly-trained talent pool. The Florida Chamber believes a talented workforce is Florida’s best long-term economic development strategy. From early learning to lifelong learning, Florida wins when we match business needs with talent. While the teachers’ union continues to put their interests before Florida’s students, the Florida Chamber will continue to fight for students and champion Florida’s entire education system — especially Florida’s future workforce.

The Florida Chamber’s focus includes:

  • Preparing Florida’s Workforce and Addressing the Skills Gap
  • Investing in Digital and Virtual Education Technology
  • Adequately Preparing Florida’s Youngest Learners
  • Supporting STEM Initiatives
  • Championing School Choice and Competition
  • Continuing to Improve Florida’s K-12 System
  • Empowering Florida’s Best Teachers

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

  • Supporting STEM Initiatives
    Renewing a focus on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) initiatives, with a renewed focus on Medicine, throughout Florida’s education system gives students greater opportunities to become globally competitive. The Florida Chamber will continue to support efforts that introduce STEM concepts early in a child’s education.
  • Attracting and Retaining World Class Talent
    From manufacturing and engineering to R&D and medicine, attracting and retaining talent in emerging and targeted industries means advocating for programs that help our state remain competitive.

Act Now

The Florida Chamber will continue to advocate for STEM as a way to help our students become globally competitive. We believe that a quality education and workforce development system is the best way to enable Floridians to compete in a 21st century global economy.