Growing Florida’s Manufacturing Industry

 

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Why It Matters to Florida

Did you know manufacturing contributes more than $40 billion to Florida’s economy?

In fact, manufacturing jobs are estimated to grow by four percent by 2021 and for every 10 jobs created in Florida’s export-oriented manufacturing, 12 more jobs are created in transportation, warehousing and retail. Florida has more than 360,000 manufacturing employees earning, on average, more than $54,000 annually, which is higher than the state’s average wage.

The impact of manufacturing on Florida’s global economy is significant. Growing Florida’s manufacturing industry is essential, especially as Florida continues to be a global hub for trade. Florida’s manufacturing industry provides more than 92 percent of Florida exports and creates private-sector jobs while diversifying Florida’s economy.

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

The impact that the manufacturing industry has on Florida is undeniable. In order to help continue growing Florida’s manufacturing industry, the Florida Chamber will continue to champion efforts that support Florida’s manufacturing industry. The Florida Chamber is committed to following the recommendations in the Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report, which seeks to create 150,000 new jobs in industries like trade, logistics, manufacturing and exporting.

As Florida’s economy moves toward innovation and high wage, high-value jobs in emerging industries, we must have the workforce ready to fill these new positions. With 265,200 jobs looking for people and 369,000 people looking for jobs, the problem isn’t workforce quantity, it’s workforce quality. A strong pool of globally competitive employees will be a powerful lure for businesses who hope to prosper in our state. Together we can ensure Florida remains a leader in producing a talented workforce for every industry.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

Florida continues to move in the right direction by growing private-sector jobs, expanding new industries and strengthening international trade and logistics relationships. But our work is far from over. The Florida Chamber believes a globally competitive business climate helps businesses and families succeed. But in order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skill talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics Report.

Act Now

For more information on Trade and Logistics 2.0 recommendations or to engage your business in our international efforts, contact Alice Ancona at aancona@flchamber.com.

Solidifying Florida’s Role in Trade and Logistics

 

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Why It Matters to Florida

If Florida were a country, we would have the 17th largest economy in the world. Florida is not just competing with other states, we are competing with other countries. This speaks to the need to continuing to focus on diversifying our economy and markets of opportunity is an important strategy for success and continued growth. Florida is well positioned to not only benefit from international trade but play a pivotal role in new and emerging trade lanes. Eighty percent of the world’s purchasing power, 90 percent of economic growth, and 95 percent of consumers will live outside of U.S. borders. By 2030:

  • The volume of global goods trade and the value of services trade is expected to nearly double.
  • The world’s population will increase to 8.4 billion.

Florida’s GDP is fueled by trade. Florida is the seventh-largest export state in the U.S., with $52 billion in exports originating from Florida in 2016. Exporting is big business in Florida – 60,000 Florida companies export and we have the second highest concentration of exporters behind California. Economic development in areas such as international trade, sea port, manufacturing, aerospace, aviation and other targeted clusters is tied directly to innovation, diversification and how well Florida can adapt to growing and changing trends.

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

According to the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report, Florida can create more than 150,000 high-wage jobs by growing manufacturing, exports and trade and logistics. In order to take advantage of changing trade routes, a historic expansion of the Panama Canal, and targeted infrastructure investments, we must continue to leverage and grow opportunities.

Strengthening Florida’s rapidly growing manufacturing industry will be the key to ensuring a robust global future. The Florida Chamber supports initiatives that encourage growth in the manufacturing, trade and logistics industries as well as assist Florida companies be more competitive and have greater access in the global marketplace. The Florida Chamber will also continue to support strategic investments in our trade infrastructure, work to build a “talent supply chain” for trade, logistics and manufacturing workers and ensure an ongoing strategic presence in Washington, D.C. – advocating and positioning Florida for a leadership role at the federal level.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

In order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skilled talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 report.

Act Now

Learn how you can become involved in the Florida Chamber’s International efforts by contacting Alice Ancona and Dan Tapia. or visit www.FloridaChamber.com/InternationalProgram.

Are Florida’s Infrastructure Systems Ready for 2030?

 

Register

 

Join Statewide Leaders at Florida’s Growth & Infrastructure Summit Register Today

How will Florida handle the increase in population that is expected by 2030 and how do we prepare for this growth? Join business and industry leaders from around Florida at the Growth and Infrastructure Summit to discuss these issues and more:

  • Florida’s transportation opportunities,
  • The future of Florida’s Trade & Logistics 2.0 report,
  • Florida Chamber’s Infrastructure Coalition,
  • Autonomous Florida, and
  • Florida’s current and future infrastructure needs.

Florida Chamber Foundation 2018 Growth & Infrastructure Summit
December 11, 2018, 9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Healthy Life Center at Babcock Ranch
42880 Crescent Loop, Suite 100
Babcock Ranch, FL 33982

Attendees will also take a deeper dive into the Infrastructure and Growth Leadership portion of Florida 2030, the Florida Chamber Foundation’s three-year, multi-million dollar research project- and learn what more than 10,000 Florida leaders said about Florida’s future.

Solidifying Florida’s Role in Trade and Logistics

 

Download One Pager    Learn More Our International Program    Trade & Logistics 2.0 Report

 

Why It Matters to Florida

If Florida were a country, we would have the 16th largest economy in the world. Florida is not just competing with other states, we are competing with other countries. This speaks to the need to continuing to focus on diversifying our economy and markets of opportunity is an important strategy for success and continued growth. Florida is well positioned to not only benefit from international trade but play a pivotal role in new and emerging trade lanes. Eighty percent of the world’s purchasing power, 90 percent of economic growth, and 95 percent of consumers will live outside of U.S. borders. By 2030:

  • The volume of global goods trade and the value of services trade is expected to nearly double.
  • The world’s population will increase to 8.4 billion.

Florida’s GDP is fueled by trade. Florida is the seventh-largest export state in the U.S., with $52 billion in exports originating from Florida in 2016. Exporting is big business in Florida – 60,000 Florida companies export and we have the second highest concentration of exporters behind California. Economic development in areas such as international trade, sea port, manufacturing, aerospace, aviation and other targeted clusters is tied directly to innovation, diversification and how well Florida can adapt to growing and changing trends.

Florida’s Competitiveness Agenda

According to the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report, Florida can create more than 150,000 high-wage jobs by growing manufacturing, exports and trade and logistics. In order to take advantage of changing trade routes, a historic expansion of the Panama Canal, and targeted infrastructure investments, we must continue to leverage and grow opportunities.

Strengthening Florida’s rapidly growing manufacturing industry will be the key to ensuring a robust global future. The Florida Chamber supports initiatives that encourage growth in the manufacturing, trade and logistics industries as well as assist Florida companies be more competitive and have greater access in the global marketplace. The Florida Chamber will also continue to support strategic investments in our trade infrastructure, work to build a “talent supply chain” for trade, logistics and manufacturing workers and ensure an ongoing strategic presence in Washington, D.C. – advocating and positioning Florida for a leadership role at the federal level.

The Fight for Free Enterprise Continues

In order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skilled talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report.

Act Now

Learn how you can become involved in the Florida Chamber’s International efforts by contacting Alice Ancona at aancona@flchamber.com and Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or visit www.FloridaChamber.com/InternationalProgram.

Solidifying Florida’s Role in Trade and Logistics

> DOWNLOAD Our International One Pager

As Florida becomes the third most populous state in the nation and with an estimated six million new residents settling in our state by 2030, our state has to find new solutions that help, not only the way we view resources, but the way we run international business.

The global economy is expected to double in size throughout the next 20 years. One billion new consumers will enter the middle class by 2020, with two thirds living in emerging markets. By 2030, the world’s population will increase to 8.4 billion, 80 percent of the world’s purchasing power, 90 percent of economic growth, and 95 percent of consumers will live outside of U.S. borders.

Continuing to focus on diversifying our economy and markets of opportunity is an important strategy for success and continued growth. Free trade agreements adopted and under consideration create new business opportunities and have opened Florida to new markets. Florida is well positioned to not only benefit from international trade but play a pivotal role in new and emerging trade lanes.

Economic development in areas such as international trade, sea port, manufacturing, aerospace, aviation and other targeted clusters is tied directly to innovation, diversification and how well Florida can adapt to growing and changing trends.

According to the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 Report, Florida can create more than 150,000 high-wage jobs by growing manufacturing, exports and trade and logistics. In order to take advantage of changing trade routes, a historic expansion of the Panama Canal, and targeted infrastructure investments, we must continue to leverage and grow opportunities.

Strengthening Florida’s rapidly growing manufacturing industry will be the key to ensuring a robust global future. The Florida Chamber will support increasing Enterprise Florida’s budget for international trade and marketing activities and will continue to support initiatives that encourage growth in the manufacturing, trade and logistics industries.

The Florida Chamber will also continue to support strategic investments in our trade infrastructure, work to build a “talent supply chain” for trade, logistics and manufacturing workers and ensure an ongoing strategic presence in Washington, D.C. – advocating and positioning Florida for a leadership role at the federal level.

In order to become the number one state in the nation for innovation and economic development, we must continue to attract and retain high-skilled talent, target growing industries and continue to work toward the recommendations set forth in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Trade and Logistics 2.0 report.

Learn how you can become involved in the Florida Chamber’s International efforts by contacting Alice Ancona or visit www.FloridaChamber.com/InternationalProgram.