Florida Chamber Healthcare Partnership Survey


Florida Surgeon General Scott Rivkees is seeking your input on the CDC’s newest guidelines regarding masks and cloth coverings to help slow the spread of COVID-19.



Florida Chamber Healthcare Partnership Survey
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Small Business Loan Survey


There are several loan programs to help small businesses stay afloat during the COVID-19 pandemic.  Senator Marco Rubio worked extensively on the CARES Act, which primarily benefits small businesses with the Paycheck Protection Program.  As we continue conversations with Senator Rubio, the congressional delegation, our partners in the banking industry and at the SBA and SBDC, your input will help us guide future changes to these lending program to ensure small businesses are getting the support that they need.



Small Business Loan Survey
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A Talented Workforce and the Rising Probability of a Recession Leave Florida’s Small Businesses Feeling Uncertain

Latest Florida Chamber of Commerce Small Business Index Survey Shows

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (July 22, 2019)— While Florida’s small businesses continue boosting the state’s economy, finding qualified workers to fill available jobs tops the list of issues keeping small business owners up at night, survey results from the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Third Quarter Small Business Index Survey show. 

“Florida’s small businesses continue to be concerned about being able to hire a talented workforce,” said Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist and Director of Research at the Florida Chamber Foundation. “Improving Florida’s talent pipeline for a better workforce will help ensure jobs have talented employees, and will help put workers on the path to prosperity – leading goals of Florida 2030, Florida’s next strategic plan.”

Concerns over a likely recession are also creating economic uncertainty among job creators, the survey shows. However, while Florida’s small businesses are cautious, the state’s economy is healthy and expanding. Florida is now the 18th most diversified economy in the country, and there are rising numbers of open jobs and a declining amount of people looking for jobs.

The Florida Chamber’s third quarterly statewide Small Business Index Survey shows small businesses are most concerned about:

  1. Workforce Quality – 27%

2. Economic Uncertainty – 12%

3. Growth Management Process – 8%

4. Government Regulations – 7%

5. Healthcare Costs – 7%

Of Florida’s small businesses, 47 percent of respondents expect the economy to improve, down from 57 percent one year ago and 70 percent two years ago. They also felt that a positive indicator for businesses is that 24 percent of respondents thought it would be easier to get financing in the next six months, compared to 15 percent in last quarter’s survey.

“Florida’s economy is dependent on the small business community, and the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council remains committed to advocating on their behalf,” said Glenda Hood, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and President, Hood Partners LLC.

About the Survey:

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically June 6 through July 5, 2019. Fifty-six of respondents employ less than five employees, while 32 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click HERE to view the full report.

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

First Quarter Small Business Index Survey Shows Florida’s Small Businesses Feeling Uncertain

Potential Trade War, Expansion of Tariffs, Slowing Growth in Other Economies Leave Florida’s Small Businesses Feeling Uncertain Latest Florida Chamber Small Business Index Survey Shows

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (January 23, 2019)—While Florida’s economic outlook for 2019 is strong, the threat of a trade war, expansion of tariffs and slowing growth in other economies has Florida’s small business owners uncertain about the economy.

The Florida Chamber of Commerce’s First Quarter Small Business Index Survey shows economic uncertainty now tops the list of issues keeping small business owners up at night. This is the first time in eight quarters that economic uncertainty has risen to the number one concern – beating out workforce quality.

While Florida’s small businesses appear cautious, the truth is Florida’s future is healthy. According to data from Florida Chamber Foundation Chief Economist Dr. Jerry Parrish, Florida can expect to create 150,000 jobs in 2019 and there’s a low chance of recession.

“When job creators see uncertainty in financial or international markets, they are less likely to invest,” said Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist of the Florida Chamber Foundation, speaking at the Florida Chamber Foundation’s Economic Outlook & Jobs Summit. “To ensure Florida remains competitive, we must continue the momentum built since the last recession, and renew a focus on signaling to the world that Florida is open for business and ready for economic development investments.”

The Florida Chamber’s first quarterly statewide Small Business Index Survey shows small businesses are most concerned about:

  1. Economic Uncertainty – 23%
  2. Workforce Quality – 18%
  3. Growth Management Process – 9%
  4. Government Regulations – 9%
  5. Access to Capital – 8%

 

Of Florida small businesses, 47 percent of respondents expect the economy to improve, down from 77 percent one year ago. More interesting is that 41 percent of businesses expect the economy to weaken over the next year – up from 20 percent in last quarter’s survey and 10 percent one year ago.

“After being the top concern for eight quarters in a row, workforce quality takes second place behind economic uncertainty, which is the top concern of Florida’s small businesses,” said Glenda Hood, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and Founding Partner, triSect. “Florida’s economy is dependent on the small business community, and the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council remains committed to advocating on their behalf.”

 

About the Survey:

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically November 28, 2018 through January 3, 2019. 44 percent of respondents employ less than five employees, while 40 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click here to view the full report.

 

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Workforce Quality and Government Regulations Top Concerns in Florida Chamber Small Business Survey

2018 Elections Key to Ensuring Florida Small and Local Businesses Can Continue Creating 1 Out of Every 11 New American Jobs

 

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (October 22, 2018) — As Florida job creators prepare to cast their vote for Florida’s next Governor, they are no doubt looking at which candidate will help strengthen Florida’s workforce and tackle government regulations – top concerns of business leaders on the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s Fourth Quarter Small Business Index Survey.

For the eighth quarter in a row, employers say finding additional skilled employees to meet open job demands is their number one concern. And small and local businesses are increasingly concerned about government regulations.

 

“With Florida small and local businesses creating one out of every 11 new American jobs, the Small Business Index Survey shows that job creators will be looking for a Governor that further eliminates outdated regulations and further strengthens Florida’s workforce to ensure the available 245,300 jobs in Florida can be filled with quality employees,” said Marian Johnson, Senior Vice President, Political Operation.

 

On the upside, 59 percent of small businesses indicated confidence in the direction that Florida is taking to make the Sunshine State a better place for businesses—up from the third quarter.

As Johnson explained, looking at the gubernatorial candidates proposed plans shows their differences, and provides a clear view of the candidates’ positions on small and local businesses.

“Preparing for the future means continuing to ensure that Florida’s economy is ready and able to create prosperity through high-paying jobs, remain globally competitive, and develop vibrant and sustainable communities,” said Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist and Director of Research for the Florida Chamber Foundation.  “As we look toward 2030, we must continue to ensure businesses have access to the qualified workforce they need to continue to create jobs, and that all Floridians can pave a path toward economic prosperity.  This quarter’s Small Business Index Survey indicates that Florida’s small businesses remain increasingly concerned about workforce quality- a concern that has been consistently ranked number one for the past eight quarters. “

 

The Florida Chamber’s fourth quarterly statewide Small Business Index  Survey shows small businesses are most concerned about:

  • Workforce quality (26 percent),
  • Government regulations (9 percent),
  • Access to Capital (8 percent),
  • Economic uncertainty (8 percent)
  • Lawsuit abuse (6 percent),
  • Taxes (6 percent),
  • Healthcare costs (6 percent),

 

Of Florida small businesses, 48 percent of respondents expect to hire in the next six months, up from 45 percent last quarter. And 43 percent expect to make investments in plants or equipment, down from 49 percent one year ago.

 

“For the eighth quarter in a row, workforce quality continues to be the top concern of Florida’s small businesses, with government regulations ranking second,” said Glenda Hood, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and Founding Partner, triSect. “Florida’s economy is dependent on the small business community, and the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council remains committed to advocating on their behalf.”

 

About the Survey:

 

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically September 6, 2018 through October 11, 2018. Thirty-nine percent of respondents employ less than five employees, while 43 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click here to view the full report.

 

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

 

Florida Small Business Owners Concerned About Workforce Quality 

 

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (January 22, 2018) – Ask a Florida small business owner what keeps them up at night and they’ll likely point to the latest Florida Chamber of Commerce Small Business Index Survey, which shows workforce quality and government regulations as the top concerns of Florida’s job creators for the second straight quarter.

“Businesses are telling us, loud and clear, that in order to grow, they need access to a talented workforce,” said Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist and Director of Research for the Florida Chamber Foundation. “The Florida Chamber Foundation’s recent Florida Jobs 2030 report confirms this research by showing that the future of work is changing, and as this quarter’s Small Business Index once again shows workforce quality is top of mind for Florida’s businesses. Another trend we are seeing is businesses remain concerned about the impact government regulations have on their ability to grow. At the same time, we are seeing business confidence remain high. This signals a confidence in Florida’s economy, one that is echoed in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s newly released Florida Leading Index, which indicates job creation is expected to be substantially higher than the U.S. average.”

 

The Florida Chamber’s quarterly Small Business Index statewide survey shows small businesses are most concerned about:

  • Workforce quality (27 percent),
  • Government regulations (13 percent),
  • Healthcare costs (11 percent),
  • Lawsuit abuse (9 percent),
  • Access to capital (8 percent).

 

Of Florida small businesses, 52 percent of respondents expect to hire in the next six months – up slightly from 48 percent in our Q4 2017 survey.

“Florida’s small businesses continue to face a number of challenges, including increased concerns about workforce quality and government regulations,” said Glenda Hood, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council, and Founding Partner, triSect. “The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Council looks forward to working together to identify and support solutions that will help and grow Florida’s small business community.”

 

About the Survey:

The Florida Chamber’s Small Business Index Survey was conducted electronically December 13, 2017 through January 12, 2018. 30 percent of respondents employ less than five employees, while 41 percent employ five to 49 employees. Click here to view the full report.

 

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Established in 1916 as Florida’s first statewide business advocacy organization, the Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as crucial to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Florida Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FLChamber.com for more information.

Economic Development Task Force Finalizes Recommendations

After eight months of work and dozens of meetings, the Florida Chamber Economic Development Task Force concluded its final meeting today in Orlando at the University of Central Florida (UCF).

Led by co-chairs Glenda Hood and Leerie Jenkins, the Florida Chamber Economic Development Task Force considered feedback provided by over one thousand individuals on ways the state can become more competitive. The result: 260 recommendations, which will be released soon in a full report. The full report will include short term recommendations and ideas for future research. We look forward to sharing the full report with you once it’s finalized.

The Economic Development Task Force Meeting at UCF Featured Presentations by:

  • Tony Carvajal, Executive Director, Florida Chamber Foundation,
  • Marshall Criser III, Chancellor, State University System,
  • Kevin Darrenkamp, VP and General Counsel, Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control,
  • Doug Davidson, Florida Chamber Foundation Board of Trustees Chair and Commercial Banking Market Executive, Bank of America,
  • David Fuller, President, Sun Trust Foundation,
  • Chris Hart, President and CEO of Enterprise Florida,
  • Glenda Hood, Economic Development Task Force Co-Chair and Principal/Founder of trisect,
  • Leerie Jenkins, Economic Development Task Force Co-Chair and Chairman/CEO, RS&H,
  • Belinda Keiser, Vice Chancellor of Community Development, Keiser University,
  • Fred Kittinger, Director of State and Local Government Affairs, University of Central Florida,
  • Dr. Jerry Parrish, Chief Economist of the Florida Chamber Foundation,
  • Todd Powell, General Manager, Real Estate, Weyerhaeuser,
  • Crystal Stiles, Director, Economic Development, Florida Power & Light Company,
  • Jacob Stuart, President and CEO, Central Florida Partnership, Inc.,
  • Bob Ward, President and CEO, Florida Council of 100, and
  • Mark Wilson, President and CEO, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

A special thank you to the many members of the Florida Chamber, business leaders and economic development professionals that have participated in our Economic Development Task Force.

Learn More:

Since December 2010, Florida businesses have created more than one million private-sector jobs. To learn more about the Florida Chamber’s Economic Development Task Force, click here or email me at cjohnson@flchamber.com.