Make Florida’s Workforce Globally Competitive

 
Learn More About Florida 2030 Continue the Conversation at the Future of Florida Forum
 

By: Doug Davidson, Market Executive for Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Chair of the Florida Chamber Foundation

Published in the Tampa Bay Times

If you aren’t amazed by the speed at which technology is changing our world, just think back 20 years. Would you have imagined cellphones with the capabilities of a laptop computer or the possibility of driverless vehicles roaming the streets of Tampa? Today’s world is dominated by innovation, guiding the creation of entirely new jobs and changing the way industries operate.

To compete in today’s global markets and build on our recent successes, Florida will need to think strategically about how to build success for 2030 and beyond. Florida’s workforce must be prepared for jobs that may not exist today and may require new skills and an entirely new way of thinking.

The Florida Chamber Foundation traveled to all 67 counties and heard from more than 10,000 Floridians as part of Florida 2030, a three-year, once-a-decade, blueprint for Florida’s future. Its findings echo the No. 1 concern of businesses — that in order to succeed, Florida must develop, attract and retain a globally oriented workforce.

The recommendations released at the foundation’s annual Learners to Earners Workforce Summit show that talent is the key currency of the future. Will Florida take advantage of the opportunities in the disruptions just around the corner or will we lag behind? The future depends on us making the right choice by investing in the young men and women who will lead us in the years ahead.
 

Get Involved

Visit www.Florida2030.org to download the Drivers for Florida’s Future report, which covers all Six Pillars of Florida’s growth, and learn how you can get involved.

Florida Chamber Foundation Chair Doug Davidson Discusses Florida’s Future

“I want to help prepare our state for economic growth.”

Doug Davidson, Commercial Banking Marketing Executive, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Chair, Florida Chamber Foundation

From tomorrow’s workforce to changes in how we move people, the Florida Chamber Foundation’s focus is on our state’s future. As the new Florida Chamber Foundation Chair, Doug Davidson will lead the way to many of these future discussions.

“I think there are challenges and I think there are opportunities that can be very positive for our state,” said DAVIDSON.

As the third most populous state in the nation, and growing, meeting the needs of the next generation of Floridians is one challenge the Florida Chamber and Florida Chamber Foundation seek to address.
For instance, by 2030, its estimated water demand will increase by 20 percent and we will need infrastructure systems that can handle 150 million visitors each year. So just how does our state prepare for growth? As Davidson explains, Florida 2030 can help guide us. Florida 2030 is the culmination of years’ worth of research that will be the blueprint for our state’s strategic plan from now to 2030. The gaps captured in Florida 2030 will be pivotal for our state to succeed.

“I’m very optimistic of what the Florida 2030 study is going to do for this state,” said DAVIDSON. “It will become a unifying document, a unifying discussion around the state. The study is already underway- we have literally spoken to thousands of people, we are traveling around the state, we’re listening to people around the state about what’s important in their communities… Two million more jobs are going to be necessary to keep the same level of employment that we’re enjoying today in the state of Florida. I see the Florida 2030 study as being a statewide discussion so that we can better prepare.”

 

Resources:

European Nations Lead Investments in Florida’s Global Economy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Edie Ousley, 850-521-1231 or 850-251-6261
eousley@flchamber.com

Companies from Europe Account for 67% of all Florida
Foreign Employment and 17% of Florida Origin Exports

TALLAHASSEE, FL. (May 27, 2015) – European countries are the leaders among foreign investors, with majority foreign-owned companies from Europe accounting for 67 percent of all Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) employment in Florida, the Florida Chamber of Commerce announced today.

“Florida’s leading European investors include the UK, Germany, France, Switzerland and the Netherlands. Europe presents unique strategic, trade and export opportunities for Florida,” said Alice Ancona, Director of Global Outreach for the Florida Chamber of Commerce.  “Currently, 17 percent of all Florida origin exports go to Europe, a market of over 500 million consumers. The U.S. and Europe represent half of the world’s economic production. Opening markets and creating jobs for Florida families are why trade is important to Florida.”

Florida visitors from Europe also help strengthen Florida’s economy and create jobs. In fact, every 85 visitors that come to Florida help create one new Florida job. Out of the top international countries for visitation to Florida, the UK ranked third, behind Canada and Brazil, with 1.6 million visitors in 2014.

The impact of international trade to Florida’s economy cannot be denied.

  • International business and foreign direct investment accounts for approximately 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity, and
  • Directly supports more than 1 million Florida jobs.
  • Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products with Florida-origin exports totaling more than $58.6 billion and exports from Florida supporting 275,221 U.S. jobs in 2013.

But Florida’s business leaders know that Florida must continue to work hard to remain the leader in international initiatives.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.”

The Florida Chamber’s Global Florida Program’s mission is to educate and promote business opportunities, collaborate and advance policy initiatives in each of the four major geographic regions:  Americas, Asia Pacific, Europe and Middle East/Africa. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam recently sponsored the Florida World Trade Month resolution, which was signed by Governor Scott, Attorney General Pam Bondi and CFO Jeff Atwater.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Florida Chamber’s International Days Focuses on Making Florida More Competitive

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Edie Ousley, 850-521-1231 or 850-251-6261
eousley@flchamber.com

Global Economic Opportunities Takes Center Stage

TALLAHASSEE, FL. (April 8, 2015) – International businesses leaders joined forces today at the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s International Days to focus on making Florida more competitive through global economic opportunities. Leaders from Shanghai to Canada, representatives from Fortune 500 companies and Florida’s 15 deep water seaports, the state’s leading economic development and transportation agencies are taking part in the state’s premier international event.

Global trade is big business in Florida. International business and foreign direct investments accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity and supports more than one million Florida jobs. Florida is also home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe – many of them small to medium sized businesses.

“It’s Florida’s time because we are in the right position, we have the right culture, we have the right infrastructure,” said Lee Sandler, chair of the Florida Chamber’s International Business Council. “So Florida, and Floridian companies, are really in a position to take advantage of the global economy in ways we didn’t have available before.”

In Florida, global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity. According to a recent Florida Chamber Foundation Did You Know, Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.

Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson kicked-off the two-day event, and additional speakers will include Secretary of Transportation Jim Boxold, along with keynote speakers: Fredrik Eliasson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, CSX Transportation, and John Murphy, Senior Vice President for International Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

A complete line up of panels and speakers is located here.

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The Florida Chamber of Commerce is the voice of business and the state’s largest federation of employers, chambers of commerce and associations, aggressively representing small and large businesses from every industry and every region. The Florida Chamber works within all branches of government to affect those changes set forth in the annual Florida Business Agenda, and which are seen as critical to secure Florida’s future. The Florida Chamber works closely with its Political Operations and the Florida Chamber Foundation. Visit www.FloridaChamber.com for more information.

Florida Chamber Kicks Off International Days 2015

Florida Chamber’s International Days Focuses on Making Florida More Competitive
Global Economic Opportunities Takes Center Stage

International businesses leaders joined forces today at the Florida Chamber of Commerce’s International Days to focus on making Florida more competitive through global economic opportunities. Leaders from Shanghai to Canada, representatives from Fortune 500 companies and Florida’s 15 deep water seaports, the state’s leading economic development and transportation agencies are taking part in the state’s premier international event.

Florida Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson spoke to a packed house at the 2015 Florida Chamber International Days event in Tallahassee, FL.

Global trade is big business in Florida. International business and foreign direct investments accounts for about 17 percent of Florida’s economic activity and supports more than one million Florida jobs. Florida is also home to more than 60,000 firms dedicated to bringing their goods and services to consumers around the globe – many of them small to medium sized businesses.

“It’s Florida’s time because we are in the right position, we have the right culture, we have the right infrastructure,” said Lee Sandler, chair of the Florida Chamber’s International Business Council. “So Florida, and Floridian companies, are really in a position to take advantage of the global economy in ways we didn’t have available before.”

In Florida, global trade means high-wage jobs and economic prosperity. According to a recent Florida Chamber Foundation Did You Know, Florida is the seventh largest exporter of state-origin products.

“Florida has come a long way in building international economic development efforts, but our work is far from over,” said Doug Davidson, Market Executive of Global Commercial Banking at Bank of America Merrill Lynch. “At Bank of America, we support the Florida Chamber Foundation’s research in trade and logistics because we know that Florida’s future lies in being globally competitive.

Lt. Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera and Secretary of Commerce Bill Johnson kicked-off the two-day event, and additional speakers will include Secretary of Transportation Jim Boxold, along with keynote speakers: Fredrik Eliasson, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, CSX Transportation, and John Murphy, Senior Vice President for International Policy at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

A complete line up of panels and speakers is located here.

Follow the Event Online:

Be sure to visit the Florida Chamber’s Facebook and Twitter pages to see and read what’s happening at the event, or search for #intldays15