Amendment 2 is a Trick – Not a Treat

Readers beware – you’re in for a scare! Amendment 2’s language is a trick to voters and may allow for the widespread legalization of marijuana.

Local newspapers are warning their readers of the many problems with Amendment 2. Here’s what some of them had to say.

  • The Florida Times Union “overly vague amendment”
  • Orlando Sentinel “potentially littered with loopholes”
  • Tampa Bay Times “too broad”
  • Tampa Tribune “too many risks”
  • Panama City News Herald “will cause more problems than it solves”
  • Daytona Beach News-Journal “giant, open-ended loophole”

Florida voters are smart. They know that a NO vote will help ensure Floridians don’t get tricked.

On November 4, vote NO on 2.

 

Paid political advertisement paid for by Florida Chamber of Commerce PAC, Post Office Box 11309, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 independently of any committee.

 

 

 

 

Non-Euphoric Marijuana vs. Amendment 2: Clarity for the Dazed and Confused

Authored by: Jim Spratt, Florida Nursery Growers and Landscapers Association

During the 2014 session, Florida joined 23 other states in the legalization of cannabis for medical use by passing SB 1030. Although it was an aggressive step by the Legislature, the real litmus test for Florida will be determined in November, as voters cast their ballots on Amendment 2 to Florida’s Constitution. Below, we have outlined the differences between SB 1030 and the proposed Amendment 2.

 

SB 1030

Amendment 2

What forms of cannabis are allowed? non- euphoric, non-smokable cannabis products must not be edible (such as foods or candies) and under no circumstances does the law allow the sale of any smokable form of cannabis. Amendment 2 allows ingested, smokable and edible forms of cannabis products so long as such is prescribed by a medical doctor.
Which conditions qualify for cannabis use? Patients diagnosed with Cancer or physical medical conditions that chronically produce symptoms of seizures or severe and persistent muscle spasms Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), hepatitis C, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Crohn’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis or other conditions for which a physician believes the medical use of marijuana will likely outweigh the potential health risks for a patient. Additionally, it creates a “pot for any purpose” scenario in which a recommendation, not a doctor’s prescription, can be used to treat fatigue, neck/back aches, menstrual cramps and sleepless nights – far from debilitating medical conditions.
Who can produce and dispense cannabis?  SB 1030 created five geographic regions and directed one dispensary be licensed in each region. Under the law, the Dispensing Organization must demonstrate the ability to cultivate, process, produce and distribute cannabis; demonstrate businesses financial stability; have the ability to secure infrastructure; and, must be a nursery which has operated in Florida for at least 30 continuous years and be licensed to produce at least 400,000 nursery plants. Amendment 2 allows a business to “acquire, cultivate, possess, process (including development of related products such as food, tinctures, aerosols, oils, or ointments), transfer, transport, sale, distribute, dispense, or administer marijuana, products containing marijuana, related supplies, or educational materials” to qualifying patients or their personal caregivers. 

While Amendment 2 prescribes the Florida Department of Health as the regulatory agency, the Amendment sets no parameters on what types of businesses can be licensed to grow cannabis and the locations of the dispensaries.

Is there a limit to the varieties grown? The law limits cannabis varieties to those with 0.8 percent or less THC content (the euphoric component) and 10 percent cannabidiol (the medicinal component) by weight. Most commonly, people refer to Charlotte’s Web as the variety which meets these parameters, yet other varieties similar in percentage THC and cannabidiol are currently available. Security requirements and quality control of the products are also not specifically addressed under Amendment 2.

 

 

While there are differences between SB 1030 and Amendment 2, cannabis is illegal to cultivate, process or sale under federal law. The U.S. House of Representatives has demonstrated some interest in wrestling with the illegal status of medical marijuana. In fact, legislation was recently introduced to exempt cannabis plants with very low THC percentages from the Federal Controlled Substances Act. The U.S. House also passed a bill to allow banks to handle cash transactions from dispensaries and other marijuana businesses in legalized states. The Farm Bill now allows industrial hemp to be grown for academic or research purposes. And, the U.S. House passed a bill to block funds for Drug Enforcement Agency raids on marijuana dispensaries that are legal under state laws. However, the U.S. Senate has yet to act on any of these House-passed measures.

To protect Florida’s constitution from special interests trying to buy a place in it in order to force their ideas onto Floridians, and to protect Floridians from large scale marijuana commercialization and sales, the Florida Chamber opposes Amendment 2.

Learn more about why the Florida Chamber is saying No on Amendment 2 here and help us protect Floridians and our constitution.

Florida Chamber and Gov. Bush Join Don’t Let Florida Go To Pot Coalition

The Florida Chamber of Commerce and former Gov. Jeb Bush recently expressed concerns about Amendment 2 and the problems it could create by allowing large scale marijuana commercialization and sales in Florida, and added their voices to the Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot coalition.

“Florida leaders and citizens have worked for years to make the Sunshine State a world-class location to start or run a business, a family-friendly destination for tourism and a desirable place to raise a family or retire,” said Gov. Bush. “Allowing large-scale, marijuana operations to take root across Florida, under the guise of using it for medicinal purposes, runs counter to all of these efforts. I believe it is the right of states to decide this issue, and I strongly urge Floridians to vote against Amendment 2 this November.”

The Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot coalition is a collective effort of local and state organizations working together to educate Floridians on the dangers of marijuana and efforts to allow marijuana for supposed medical uses in Florida.

“Normally we focus on creating jobs, improving education and making Florida more competitive, but this is the type of business Florida can do without,” said Mark Wilson, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. “I find it curious that the largest funder of the push to legalize pot is a personal injury trial lawyer firm, yet such measures are overwhelmingly opposed by Florida’s medical and law enforcement community. Florida voters are smart and when the facts are on the table, I believe they will say no to drugs in Florida.”

Also joining the coalition are our partners at the Associated Builders and Contractors of Florida and the Florida Trucking Association.

National drug policy expert Calvina Fay, Executive Director of the Drug Free America Foundation, raised another red flag that she says is most concerning. “Our greatest fear is that this will make marijuana much more available to kids and, worse, almost normalize it to them. They’ll see that it is legal and supposedly being used as medicine, so they think it is not big deal,” said Fay.

Learn more about why the Florida Chamber is saying No on Amendment 2 here and help us protect Floridians and our constitution.

Florida Chamber & Gov. Bush Join ‘Don’t Let Florida Go To Pot’ Coalition

The Florida Chamber of Commerce and former Gov. Jeb Bush today expressed concerns about Amendment 2 and the problems it could create by allowing large scale marijuana commercialization and sales in Florida, and added their voices to the Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot coalition.

“Florida leaders and citizens have worked for years to make the Sunshine State a world-class location to start or run a business, a family-friendly destination for tourism and a desirable place to raise a family or retire,” said Gov. Bush. “Allowing large-scale, marijuana operations to take root across Florida, under the guise of using it for medicinal purposes, runs counter to all of these efforts. I believe it is the right of states to decide this issue, and I strongly urge Floridians to vote against Amendment 2 this November.”

Flyer_FL Chamber Joins Dont Let FL Go to Pot Coalition The Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot coalition is a collective effort of local and state organizations working together to educate Floridians on the dangers of marijuana and efforts to allow marijuana for supposed medical uses in Florida.“Normally we focus on creating jobs, improving education and making Florida more competitive, but this is the type of business Florida can do without,” said Mark Wilson, President and CEO of the Florida Chamber of Commerce. “I find it curious that the largest funder of the push to legalize pot is a personal injury trial lawyer firm, yet such measures are overwhelmingly opposed by Florida’s medical and law enforcement community. Florida voters are smart and when the facts are on the table, I believe they will say no to drugs in Florida.”

 

Also joining the coalition are our partners at the Associated Builders and Contractors of Florida and the Florida Trucking Association.

National drug policy expert Calvina Fay, Executive Director of the Drug Free America Foundation, raised another red flag that she says is most concerning. “Our greatest fear is that this will make marijuana much more available to kids and, worse, almost normalize it to them. They’ll see that it is legal and supposedly being used as medicine, so they think it is no big deal,” said Fay.

 

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