Global Trade Dinner: Register Today, Seating Limited

Uniting To Grow Florida Into a Top 10 Global Economy

To grow Florida into a top 10 economy, we must strengthen Florida’s position as a global trade leader, and ensure Florida’s exports in goods double and exports in services triple by 2030. The Florida Chamber’s Global Florida Dinner is uniting Florida’s business community for good, and connecting free enterprise and free trade to help enhance the prosperity of all Floridians while building on Florida’s competitiveness as a global hub for trade.

Register today and join international stakeholders from across Florida for a dynamic evening focused on strengthening Florida’s role in global trade and investment. This premier event precedes the annual Florida Transportation, Growth and Infrastructure Summit slated for December 5. Want to attend both? Click here for details.

Florida Chamber of Commerce Annual Global Florida Dinner
December 4, 2019 – 6:30 p.m.
The Diplomat Beach Resort, 3555 S. Ocean Drive – Hollywood, Florida

Featured Speakers

Laurel M. Lee
Secretary of State
State of Florida
Bob Grammig
Florida Chamber International Business Committee Chair & Partner, Holland & Knight

Global Florida Webinar: Tools for Going Global

Thank you for your interest in the Florida Chamber’s Global Florida webinar. We appreciate the opportunity to provide business leaders like you with an in-depth discussion on trade opportunities for your company.

Get connected to global opportunities by becoming a member of the Florida Chamber’s International Program. Contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or (850) 521-1206.

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from August 30, 2019.

Global Florida Presentation: August 2019
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Global Florida Webinar: Pacific Alliance

Thank you for your interest in the Florida Chamber’s Global Florida webinar. We appreciate the opportunity to provide business leaders like you with an in-depth discussion on trade opportunities for your company.

Get connected to global opportunities by becoming a member of the Florida Chamber’s International Program. Contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or (850) 521-1206.

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from July 24, 2019.

Global Florida Presentation: July 2019
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2019 Florida International Trade & Investment Conference Presentation

Thank you for your interest in the Florida Chamber’s Florida International Trade & Investment Conference presentation. We appreciate the opportunity to provide business leaders like you with an in-depth discussion on trade opportunities for your company.

Get connected to global opportunities by becoming a member of the Florida Chamber’s International Program. Contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or (850) 521-1206.

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida International Trade & Investment Conference presentation.

FITIC: May 30, 2019
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Global Florida Webinar: World Trade Month Edition

Thank you for your interest in the Florida Chamber’s Global Florida webinar. We appreciate the opportunity to provide business leaders like you with an in-depth discussion on trade opportunities for your company.

The Global Florida presentation from April 330 includes information on an update on World Trade Month.

Get connected to global opportunities by becoming a member of the Florida Chamber’s International Program. Contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or (850) 521-1206.

 

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from April 30, 2019.

Global Florida Presentation: April 30, 2019
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2019 Global Trade Outlook

Thank you for your interest in the Florida Chamber’s Global Florida webinar. We appreciate the opportunity to provide business leaders like you with an in-depth discussion on trade opportunities for your company.

The Global Florida presentation from January 31 includes information on an update on Florida’s 2019 Global Trade Outlook, as well as trends and key factors.

Get connected to global opportunities by becoming a member of the Florida Chamber’s International Program. Contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or (850) 521-1206.

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from September 25, 2018.

 

 

 

 

Global Florida Presentation: Jan. 31, 2019
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2019 Global Trade Outlook

Thank you to those who were able to join us for our recent Florida Chamber Global Florida webinar. We appreciated the opportunity to provide an update on Florida’s 2019 Global Trade Outlook, as well as trends and key factors.

If You Missed the Webinar, Here are Three Big Takeaways:

1. Gonzalo Arance, Deputy Director, Enterprise Florida, Inc. – Spain Office, shared a trade outlook, an update on market strategies in Spain, and discussed various markets of opportunity including pharmaceuticals and banking. Arance also highlighted the strong economic ties between Spain and Florida, noting that Florida is the state with the largest presence of Spanish companies.

2. Hesam Houryaband, Deputy Director, Enterprise Florida, Inc. – Canada Office, discussed the deep economic ties between Florida and Canada, as well as provided an outlook on Canadian Foreign Direct Investment opportunities in Florida, which include Aerospace, Fintech and software design.

3. Alice Ancona, Director, International Strategy & Policy, International Trade and Investment Office, Florida Chamber of Commerce, provided an overview of Florida’s latest trade numbers and trends, which included a lower global trade forecast as trade tensions continue through 2019. Ancona also discussed Florida’s diversified trade ties to Europe, most notably with the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Spain.

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from January 31, 2019.

For more information, please contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or 850.521.1206.

 

Global Florida Presentation: Jan. 31, 2019
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Ireland & the United Kingdom: Trade Mission & Matchmaking

The Florida Chamber of Commerce will be leading a Business Development and Trade Mission to Dublin, Ireland and London, United Kingdom, December 3-7, 2018. This mission will provide Florida businesses with the opportunity to meet with potential customers and partners.

Florida exporters will have the opportunity to take advantage of matchmaking services in Dublin and London. This opportunity includes:

– Customized market and industry briefings with a qualified trade specialist
– Market Research
– Appointments with prospective trade partners in key industry sectors

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from September 25, 2018.

For more information, please contact Dan Tapia at dtapia@flchamber.com or 850.521.1206.

 

 

 

Global Florida Presentation: Sept. 25, 2018
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Tariffs, Trade and Trump…What Does It Mean for Florida?

We have been experiencing an escalation in trade tensions that threaten to disrupt global trade flows. How will this all impact Florida? What does this mean for businesses like yours?

The Florida Chamber of Commerce kicked off World Trade Month with our Global Florida Webinar on May. The discussions included:

– Administrative action on tariffs and how they will impact Florida’s trade and logistics sector

-Florida’s latest trade and visitor data – Trends and opportunities for your company

-Update on the status of trade negotiations

Download a Complimentary Presentation Today

Complete the form below to get a complimentary copy of the Florida Chamber of Commerce Global Florida presentation from May 1, 2018.

For more information, please contact Dan Tapia at dtabpia@flchamber.com or 850.521.1206.

 

 

 

Global Florida Presentation: May 1, 2018
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NAFTA

The Florida Chamber continues to monitor developments on the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and provided an update on the status of negotiations during our November Global Florida webinar.

NAFTA was implemented in 1994 is currently being modernized.  The United States, Canada and Mexico recently stated that they would extend NAFTA negotiations into next year.  The fifth round of negotiations is scheduled to begin November 17th in Mexico City.

Last week’s Global Florida webinar, held in partnership with the Greater Miami Chamber of Commerce and the Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce, focused on the ongoing North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) renegotiations between Canada, Mexico and the U.S.

We were honored to be joined by The Honorable Neal Dunn, Florida’s 2nd Congressional District, who was introduced by Stan Connally, Jr., Chair-Elect , Florida Chamber of Commerce, Chair of the Florida Chamber’s Policy Council, and Chairman, President & CEO of Gulf Power Company. Congressman Dunn shared his support for creating a more equitable environment and improving market conditions for Florida growers under a modernized NAFTA.

We were also delighted to hear from Susan Harper, Consul General of Canada, and Ron Oleynik, Partner, Holland & Knight. Ms. Harper spoke on Canada’s unique relationship with Florida and its positive economic impact to our state’s economy, as well as the Canadian perspective on NAFTA modernization. Mr. Oleynik highlighted the benefits of modernizing NAFTA and the possible consequences of withdrawal. Alice Ancona, Director, International Strategy & Policy at the Florida Chamber of Commerce, provided an update on Florida’s trade numbers.

The Florida Chamber stands committed to working to expand Florida’s position as an international trade leader. Please mark your calendars for our next Global Florida webinar on Tuesday, January 16 at 3:00 p.m., which will focus on the Global Trade Outlook for 2018. Registration information will be provided at a later date.

Click here to download presentation.

Click here to read the Florida Chamber’s NAFTA letter.

The New Suez Canal

With 90 percent of the world’s trade moving by sea, the expanded Suez Canal will be a game changer.

 

Quick Facts:

  • $8 billion, 44.7 mile extension to the Suez Canal will for the first time allow two-way traffic on the canal
  • The new channel allows for a reduction in transit times from 18 to 11 hours
  • Provides increased capacity for vessels with drafts over 45 feet (prior to the opening of the new channel, only eight vessels with drafts greater than 45 feet could be accommodated on the canal at any one time)
  • The extension to the canal has seen 72 kilometers (44.7 miles) of new canal created, parallel to the current channel. The projected included 35 kilometers (21.7 miles)of dry digging and 37 kilometers (23 miles) of deepening
  • The average size of ships on the Far East-U.S. East Coast route via the Suez Canal has increased by 73 percent since 2005 to 7,800 twenty-foot-equivalent units, while vessels on the same trade via the Panama Canal have grown by only 12 percent in capacity to 4,600 TEUs due to size restrictions.

 

What Does This Mean for the East Coast and Florida?

The Suez Canal has benefited from delays to the Panama Canal expansion as a number of carriers with larger ships in excess of 8,000 TEU ships, have taken advantage of the larger capacities the Suez Canal and have switched to this route. For a brief period during the U.S. West Coast ports disruption, the ratio of Asia-U.S. East Coast through the Suez surpassed those via the Panama Canal.  That ratio is now slightly back in Panama’s favor as carriers are preparing for the opening of an expanded Panama Canal.

The Asia-U.S. East Coast route is undergoing a period of dramatic changes based on strong eastbound demand, Beneficial Cargo Owners (BCOs) lack of confidence in West Coast ports, a changed shipping alliance structure and new services have helped boost the Suez route.  Drewry, a specialist research and advisory organization for the maritime sector, estimates that extent of cargo shift from the west to east coasts was at 375,000 TEUs between January and June and shows no sign of reducing. U.S. east coast ports have proven to be able to absorb this additional volume with minor disruptions.

The expanded Suez Canal and look forward to continuing to increase its service to the U.S. East coast market, but the degree to which it will increase service will depend on macro events such as how competitive it will remain against an open and expanded Panama Canal in April, Chinese export growth and South East Asian export growth to name a few.

 

A Tale of Two Canals

The opening of these two expanded Canals within a year of each other will deepen the rivalry between the two, particularly for services connecting Asia with the U.S. East Coast, which is now intensified in light of West Coast – East Coast cargo shift.  This is the route where the two canals are in in direct competition with each other.

The new expanded Panama locks, which are due to open in April 2016, will further the rivalry as trade may shift back in favor of an expanded Panama Canal.  The Panama Canal’s decision to temporarily reduce its draft from September 8 due to the draught caused by El Nino is not expected to have any significant impact on Far East-U.S. East Coast services, as it will affect less than 20 percent of the transits.

The average size of ships on the Far East-U.S. East Coast route via the Suez Canal has increased by 73 percent since 2005 to 7,800 twenty-foot-equivalent units, while vessels on the same trade via the Panama Canal have only increased by 12 percent in capacity to 4,600 TEUs due to size restrictions.

The opening of the new Panama locks will allow carriers to transit larger ships through the Panama Canal which will position it to recapture some market share lost the Suez Canal since 2008.

The Panama Canal’s share of the Far East-U.S. East Coast trade has decreased from approximately 90 percent before 2008 to a low of 48 percent in 2014 before recovering to 51 percent currently as a result of the recent launch of five new shipping services.

The Panama Canal’s share is expected to increase to over 70 percent by the end of 2016 as most of the Suez market share from China will likely return to the shorter Panama Canal route.  Trade from South East Asia is expected to preserve the Suez Canal route as that is the shorter route to the U.S. East Coast.

 

What Does This Mean for Florida?

The West Coast-East Coast cargo shift occurred earlier than anticipated due to the west coast port disruptions and delays in the opening of an expanded Panama Canal. The Suez Canal has grown in importance to the U.S. East Coast as manufacturing shifts from China to South East Asia have boosted trade to the U.S. via this shorter route.  Florida ports have captured some of this shift but opportunities remain to capture more.  An expanded Panama Canal will rebalance Asian trade bound for the East Coast in its favor.  Florida will have the first U.S. port of entry at 50 ft depth to receive the larger ships by the time the Panama Canal opens.  Our ability to capture this trade and demonstrate the strength of our connectivity due to our intermodal investments to increase capacity and connectivity to the larger U.S. market will be crucial to this effort.

Florida ports have experienced cargo growth since the West Coast Ports shut down, as shown in the below news articles:

The above are just a few recent headlines. In order for Florida to continue to remain competitive, continued investment in ports, transportation and logistical infrastructure is key for Florida to remain competitive.

 

THERE ARE SEVERAL WAYS TO GET INVOLVED:

  1. Join our legislative “Fly-In” in Washington, D.C. on September 9-10 and lend your voice to our advocacy efforts at the Federal level for these strategic investments in Florida’s future.
  2.  Register today and share your voice with Florida’s transportation infrastructure leaders at the Florida Chamber’s Transportation Summit in December.
  3. Download and share the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics study.

European Uncertainty

As the Greek crisis approaches conclusion, the overall economic health of the EU comes into question.

While there has been recovery (the Eurozone is growing at an annual rate of 1.3 percent), it has been sporadic.

In the second quarter of the year France and Italy, which account for 40 percent of the Eurozone economy, slumped. Italy, which had only recently emerged from recession, fell back, managing growth of just 0.2 percent.

Unemployment numbers are also troubling:

Unemployment (June 2015)

  • EU 9.6 percent
  • Eurozone 11.1  percent
  • Greece 25.6 percent (April)
  • Spain 22.5 percent
  • Italy 12.7 percent
  • France 10.2 percent
  • Germany 4.7 percent

Source: Eurostat

Other challenges remain.  Germany is doing well but its exports will be impacted by a slowdown in Asia, many new jobs are temporary, unemployment figures remain high, and future energy prices are uncertain.

EuroAreaGDP

What Does This Mean for Florida?

Europe has traditionally been an important source of foreign direct investment to the state.  An uncertain economic future for Europe could lead to more European companies considering expansion or relocation to stronger and more stable economic environments such as Florida.  Further slowdown in Asian economies could also lead to an interest in diversification and the pursuit of other markets which Florida could serve as a point of entry to.

 

LEARN MORE:

Positioning Florida as a strategic and important destination for foreign direct investment (FDI) is a key strategy. This is a strategy identified in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics study. To learn more about how the Florida Chamber is work to build Florida’s international relationships, contact Alice Ancona today at aancona@flchamber.com.

India and the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation

Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) launched an initiative, ‘India and APEC: Charting a Path to Membership,’ to develop the case and a strategy for gaining India’s membership in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC). The ASPI initiative will be supported in India by leading business association Confederation of Indian Industry (CII).

Joining APEC would be a game-changer for India and would position it for integration into global supply chains as well as serve as a bridge to one day joining the TPP.

India is Asia’s third largest economy and its participation in APEC would be a win for India and the region, particularly at a time when China’s economy is slowing down.  India’s entry will require it to update its policy and regulatory environment preparing it for greater market access and trade liberalization in order to fully participate in the global market place.

APEC had a moratorium on new membership for a decade, which has now been lifted.

APEC’s members include the U.S., Russia, China, Australia and Japan. It represents 2.8 billion people and accounts for 57 percent of the world’s gross domestic product and 47 percent of global trade.

What Does This Mean for Florida?

While India is not one of Florida’s top trading partners, its potential is tremendous.  Its large economy still remains a “sleeping giant” as it has not fully integrated into the global market place and still lacks critical infrastructure investments to maximize capacity and stimulate business growth. India’s integration into APEC could open doors for greater market access to U.S./Florida exporters and businesses looking to tap into its potential. Relationship building is important for Florida to be at the forefront of an emerging powerhouse that is India poised to become.

 

Learn More:

In order to remain globally competitive, Florida needs to diversity our trading partners and markets to expand and grow Florida trade.  This is a strategy identified in the Florida Chamber Foundation’s most recent Trade and Logistics study. To learn more about how the Florida Chamber is work to build Florida’s international relationships, contact Alice Ancona today at aancona@flchamber.com.

MERCOSUR

MERCOSUR, a trading bloc made up of South American countries, was created in 1991 to promote free trade and the fluid movement of goods.

MERCOSUR bloc met in July at their 48th summit where Bolivia was officially incorporated as its sixth permanent member.  More newsworthy, particularly in light of the bloc’s troubled economic performance, there was some progress towards advancing on long-stalled trade initiatives, specifically an agreement with the EU.  These initiatives appear to show promise are in part due to mounting pressure from Brazil to gain greater market access.

Trade among member countries continues to decline with a 20.3 percent drop in the first quarter of 2015 compared to the same period last year. Last year, intra-bloc trade declined 13.1 percent.  All of the Mercosur member countries were hit with a decline in exports to other member states according to a report recently released by the Argentine Chamber of Commerce (CAC). The report highlighted the following:

  • Venezuela with a 46.3 percent decline
  • Uruguay with a 32.6 percent decline
  • Argentina with 24.9 percent decline
  • Brazil with 13.7 percent decline
  • Paraguay with a 12.5 percent decline

Intra-regional trade has not been the only problem as the overall export sector has taken a hit due to commodity prices and economic instability as well as uncertainty facing its largest member nations.

Obstacles still remain such as Mercosur’s Resolution 32/2000, which requires consensus from all members in trade issues, including bilateral agreements.  Resolution 32/2000 has been called a source of gridlock by Forbes because of the requirement of consensus from all members on all trade issues. Overcoming a culture of protectionism will also be a challenge as this has led to a countless regulations which will be difficult to reverse and will likely makes any short term gains improbable.

What does this mean for Florida? A decline in MERCOSUR bloc economies has had an impact on Florida’s overall trade numbers. Brazil, Florida’s most important trading partner, saw a decline of 11.3 percent, significantly affecting Florida exports in several sectors.  Argentina and Venezuela are also important Florida export destinations and their instability and uncertainty have also had repercussions.

But bright spots remain in Latin America. Peru, an important member of the Pacific Alliance, is growing and is well positioned for additional growth.  While the Pacific Alliance bloc is not as large – economically speaking – as MERCOSUR, its benefits from strong policies that favor increased market access and openness which will certainly generate new opportunities for Florida exporters.

 

Get Involved:

Learn what your business needs to know in order to successfully trade with the world’s growing economies by becoming a part of the Florida Chamber’s Global Florida program. Contact Alice Ancona today for more information.

Africa’s Economy is on the Rise

Seven of the world’s ten fastest growing economies are in Africa. North Africa expects a four to seven percent GDP growth by 2020, while Sub-Saharan Africa expects a six to seven percent growth. Experts project a population boom so large that by 2100, 40 percent of the world’s population will be African. The middle class is expected to triple from 150 million people in 2010 to 490 million in 2040. Africa’s workforce is projected to be 1 billion by 2040, the largest in the world.  Nigeria overtook South Africa as the continent’s biggest economy last year, but South Africa remains the region’s richest, while Morocco is positioning itself to be the business “gateway” for the continent.

While Africa has great potential for growth with increased urbanization and rising incomes, challenges still arise for this emerging nation.

Automobiles:

Africa currently has some of the lowest rates of car ownership – Kenya has just 9 cars for every 1,000 people, Nigeria has 13, Cote d’Ivoire 16, Zimbabwe 45, and South Africa 103.

However, recent investment by automakers shows confidence in the market.

  • VOLKSWAGEN AG resumed assembling vehicles in Nigeria for the first time in 25 years in a bid to foster sales growth in Africa.
  • Peugeot Citroen plans to build assembly plant in Morocco.

Clothing Manufacturing:

Africa is also now seen as the final frontier in global clothing manufacturing.  Low cost labor is one factor but more importantly, African countries can grow their own cotton, which shortens production time- you can go from field to factory all in one place. Ethiopia was recently identified as a top sourcing destination by apparel companies, according to McKinsey & Co.—the first time an African country was mentioned alongside dominant Asian players.  Several clothing giants are starting to source in Africa with more in the works. While it will be many years before Africa can challenge China and other Southeast Asian leaders in this industry, Africa’s prospects look promising.

Ports:

Maersk, owner of world’s largest container liner in Nigerian and Kenyan ports, also has a hand in Africa’s expansion.  Maersk expects a 10 percent growth East African region this year, supported by strong economic growth, increased political stability, a growing middle class and improved efficiency at major ports as Kenya and Tanzania have been increasing investment in their harbors.

Kenya’s economy is expected to grow by 6.9 percent this year and Tanzania’s 7.2 percent, according to the International Monetary Fund.

This growth does not come without its challenges. Growing economies and consumer demands drive the need for port expansion yet, African ports are finding themselves without the land necessary to make such expansion possible.  Increased urbanization has limited the land available around ports, which are now using dredged material and reclaiming land to expand container terminal capacity. This expensive solution highlights the need for Africa to maximize its port and landside capacity to be able to keep up with demand and help support growing trade.

Other challenges still hamper Africa’s potential. Many African countries lack transportation infrastructure to truly leverage these and other opportunities. Workforce is also a challenge. Education and training gaps exists as Africa’s growing economy is not readily adjusting and matching education to jobs and industry needs. Programs to identify these gaps are in development, but are still too few to match growth needs.

Lack of electricity is also a barrier to growth. Weak power grids and unreliable and inconsistent electricity is stunting industries at crucial times, with power outages often stopping production for hours. Nigeria, Africa’s biggest economy last year, is so challenged by its inability to produce enough power that the country mostly runs on private generators.

Power shortages present an opportunity for investment for many countries and private companies, but it may be many years before these investment will yield results.